04/16/2015

Honoring our library volunteers during National Volunteer and National Library Weeks
Volunteers are everyday heroes who make a lasting impact on local nonprofits and our community.  As Archuleta County organizations join nonprofits around the world in honoring our nation’s volunteers, we remember the words of Minnesota spiritual director Elizabeth Andrew who said, “Volunteers do not necessarily have more time; they just have more heart.”

That is certainly true of our volunteers, who are very busy people but still make time for unpaid service to your library.  And since this is also National Library Week, we are doubly delighted to honor them.  In 2014, we had 20 people who volunteered on a regular basis.  They contributed 1,010 hours, almost one-half of a full-time position.  This is a huge contribution to a small, rural library with a limited budget.

Volunteers are vital to the operation of your library.  They help with shelving and making sure all the books and materials are in their proper place.  They help with special events.  They help on the circulation desk.  They help keep everything clean and spiffy year-round.  And they handle myriad other assignments that need doing and help us serve you well. “Please know how much we appreciate your time, energy and enthusiasm,” said director Jackie Welch of the volunteers.  “We could not operate the library without you.”

Do you have a special interest or skill that could benefit the library and our patrons?  If yes, we would love to have you join our volunteer team.  Please stop by the library to talk with Jackie.  You will be warmly welcomed.

Activities calendars available
To be sure you don’t miss any of the free activities available to you and your families at your library, we encourage you to pick up a copy of the events calendar each month.  There are three versions – kids (includes tweens), teens and adults.

Free books for four-year-olds
Libraries across Colorado are giving a free copy of “How Do Dinosaurs Get Well Soon?” by the award-winning team of Jane Yolen and Mark Teague to every four-year-old in the state from April 13-27 as part of a special family literacy project.  The goal is to encourage families to read together every day and add new books to home libraries.  Come by the library or attend any program and pick up this free book for your four-year-old youngster.  Better yet, bring your four-year-olds to pick up their own books and see the opportunities for fun and learning that are available free at your library almost any day of the week. Kristine MacNeill, youth services manager, has also arranged a special distribution to four-year-olds at our community’s three preschools – Head Start, Seeds of Learning and Our Savior Lutheran School.

Lifelong Learning lecture tonight
Tonight (Thursday, April 16) marks the start of the library’s free six-week spring Lifelong Leaning Lecture series, with a wide variety of interesting topics to enrich your life and keep your mind agile.  First talk is “Ten Tips That Could Save Your Life” by Nicole LaGioia-Lewis.  She will explain a few vital things to do in emergencies that might save your life or those of others.  All lectures take place on Thursday evenings at 5:30 p.m. (note new time) and last about an hour, followed by time for questions.  Pick up a brochure at the library for the full schedule, and watch for information on future talks in this column.

Free tween gaming
Tween gaming for fourth-sixth graders takes place on the fourth Wednesday of every month, the next one being Wednesday, April 22 from 4 – 5 p.m.   Snacks provided.

Free teen gaming
Join us every Tuesday from 4 – 5:30 p.m. for fun for teen gaming fans.  Practice your skills on the Wii and Xbox as well as board games.

Free preschool storytime
Preschoolers and their families are invited to an hour of stories, music and a craft on Wednesdays from 10 – 11 a.m.  Preschoolers will enjoy stories and songs that develop early literacy skills while having fun.  Recommended for three- to five-year-olds.

Free baby/toddler time
This is a half hour of stories, songs and fingerplays for you and your little one on Saturdays from 9:30 – 10 a.m.  Learn easy tips on how to include literacy skills in everyday family life.  Recommended for children from six months to three years of age.

Family Fun Fridays
Join us for the free Family Fridays program tomorrow (April 17) from 2-3:30 p.m., timed so that children can come after school.  This event is a special time every week for the whole family to come to the library together – parents with kids, all siblings regardless of age, or whatever combination of the family is available at that particular time.  Each week features a different activity. Tomorrow is board games.  No registration required.
Please note that this is the last month for this special family program, as it takes a break for the summer.  It likely will pick up again in the fall, maybe with some differences.

Free technology classes
Meg Wempe is available for the highly popular Tech Tuesdays and Thursdays sessions 10-noon Tuesdays and 3-5 p.m. Thursdays.  Drop in with your technology questions.  More formal sessions requiring advance registration focus on iPad Basics for absolute beginners from 11:30 – 1:30 p.m. today (Thursday, April 16) and Android 101 at the same time next Thursday, April 23.  You must bring your own registered iPad for the first one and are encouraged to bring your own device for the Android session.

Free preprogramed Nooks
Just a reminder that we have nine Nooks and three tablets programmed for your e-reading pleasure.  The eight adult content e-readers contain either fiction or nonfiction bestsellers.  The four youth e-readers contain books for children, juniors and young adults.

New downloadable 3M titles
We have added three more new New York Times bestseller downloadable e-books to our 3M Cloud Library: “Cold Betrayal,” a mystery by J.A. Jance; “Last One Home,” a women’s novel by Debbie Macomber and “World Gone By,” a suspense story by Dennis Lehane.  Access these e-books at our website by clicking on the 3M Cloud Library icon on the home page of our website.  While there, browse through a multitude of other adult, juvenile and children’s books, both bestsellers and classics, in a huge variety of genres including biographies, cookbooks, crafts and hobbies, foreign language study, health and fitness, history, medical, romance, science, self-help, travel, true crime and more.

DVDs
We have three more 2015 Academy Award nominated or winning films – “Unbroken,” “Into the Woods” and “The Tale of the Princess Kaguya.”  We also have the family comedy “Mr. Peabody & Sherman,” the 2014 award-winning documentary “Alive Inside” and Tony Hillerman’s “Coyote Waits.”  As well, there is “The Addams Family,”  “I Dream of Jeannie” and “Touched by an Angel,” all the  complete first seasons of these TV series; “Saint Ralph,” an inspirational story of a young runner; and “Born into Brothels,” an American-Indian documentary set in Calcutta.

Large print westerns
We have seven new westerns in the large print format:  “Flintlock: Gut-Shot” and “McCallister: The Eagles Legacy Dry Gulch Ambush” by William W. and J.A. Johnstone, “Shadow on the Mesa” by Lee Martin, “Far as the Eye Can See” by Robert Bausch, “Golden Riders” by Ralph Cotton, “Crow Creek Crossing” by Charles G. West and “Ralph Compton: The Dangerous Land” by Marcus Galloway.

Other large print
“Cold Betrayal” by J.A. Jance is the latest in the Ali Reynolds mystery series.  “The Vendetta of Felipe Espinosa” by Adam James Jones is a novel about a man who may have been our nation’s first serial killer.

Music CDs
Come in and take a look at the wide variety of music CDs we have available to borrow, thanks to donations from patrons like you.  You’ll find blue grass, classical, jazz, rock and more for your enjoyment.

Thanks to our donors
For books and materials, we thank Arlie Sweet and several anonymous donors.

Quotable Quote
“Millennials (born from 1981 to 1997) will this year officially overtake Baby Boomers as the largest generation alive in the U.S., according to new analysis of Census Bureau data.” – The New York Times

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