9/17/2020

Virtual voter registration tutorial next Tuesday

Are you registered to vote?  Do you know how to review your voter registration or update information to ensure you are eligible to vote?  Join us on Facebook on Tuesday, September 22 from noon – 1 p.m. for this informative tutorial.  After the event, it will be posted on the library’s website to view anytime or share with friends.

Here’s how to access the videos after the event:  If you have a Facebook account, log in to Facebook and search for the Ruby Sisson Memorial Library. If you don’t have a Facebook account, access the page by visiting our website and clicking the Facebook icon (a lowercase f)  in the upper left hand corner of the screen. Or contact us and we can send you a direct link.  

Summary of our partial reopening

  • We’re now open on Thursdays from 1 p.m.- 7 p.m. with 1-2 p.m. reserved for seniors and higher risk populations. 
  • Other hours: Mondays, Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Fridays: 10 a.m.-3 p.m. with 9 a.m.-10 a.m. for seniors and higher risk populations. Saturdays: 10 a.m-2 p.m.  Sundays: closed
  • We are accepting meeting room reservations for small groups, with library programs having first dibs on the rooms for our programs.  In addition, you can schedule only so far out, usually two weeks to a month, depending on where we are in the month. 
  • Up to 30 patrons at a time can come into the building.
  • Hand sanitizers are available and there will be frequent cleanings inside the building throughout the day.  Please practice social distancing and wear facial coverings while you are in the building.  If you don’t have a mask, we are happy to give one to you.
  • Nine computers are available. In most cases computer usage will be allowed for three hours per day. Staff will clean and disinfect the computers between uses.
  • One early literacy computer is available for youngsters Monday-Saturday.
  • For those not comfortable coming into the building or unable to wear a mask, curbside service continues Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. except for Thursdays when it’s available from 9 a.m.-7 p.m., and on Saturday from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.  Phone 264-2209 when you are in the parking lot so staff can bring the items out for you.  If you put a hold on something, please wait for your usual alert (email, phone call or text) before coming to pick it up.  
  • You now can drop your returns of books, CDs and DVDs in the dropbox at City Market, as well as in the dropbox at the library.  No donations in the City Market box, please.
  • Notary service is available during open hours on Monday, Tuesday,  Friday and Saturday.  Cost is $5 per notary.
  • You can place holds on items from other libraries.  They are in different stages of reopening, so items may take longer than usual. 
  • We’re happy to provide tech help in person or over the phone for our online resources.

Urgent census request – we’re lagging the state

Have you completed your census questionnaire?

The current self-response rate of Archuleta County households is only 41.8% compared to 68.9% for the State of Colorado and the national rate of 65.6%. This self-response rate is a reflection of households that completed the census online, by phone, or by mail.

Census Bureau enumerators also visit households of non-respondents to ensure everyone is counted. The efforts of census enumerators combined with an area’s self-responses give us the total number of households counted so far for that area. Nationally, the total number of households counted is 89.4%, and the state total is 89.7%. The total number for Archuleta County is not published yet, but a lot of work remains for census enumerators in our area. The best way to help them is to answer the door if you hear them knocking and respond right now to the census if you have not already done so.

It takes less than 10 minutes to respond to the census and your answers are kept anonymous. The law ensures that your private information is never published and that your answers cannot be used or shared by any government agency or court.

Please contact Brad or Josie at the library if you have any census-related questions or visit  2020census.gov for more information.

Suffrage poster display

We hope you’ll stop by the library to view a display of 10 suffrage posters celebrating the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment.  Titled “Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence,” the exhibition is a joint effort of the Smithsonian Museum and the National Portrait Gallery.  The crusade for women’s suffrage was one of the longest reform movements in U.S. history.  The posters will be on display until September 22 on the maroon wall behind the computers, on the other side of the checkout desk. 

Tech Time

Make a 15- or 30-minute appointment for one of three free in-person slots available noon-1 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Brad will help one person (or one couple) at a time.  If you have a Tech Time appointment on Thursday, phone from the parking lot or knock loudly on the front door to be let in.

ESL

Free in-person classes take place Tuesdays and Thursdays from 4-7 p.m. by appointment.  Please register so we can keep it to a small group in our limited open spaces.  No walk-ins, as the front door will be locked. 

Adult learning

GEDclasses plus HiSET, CDL and other free in-person tutoring from Mark is available on Tuesdays from 2-7 p.m. by appointment for both new and returning students. 

Dungeons & Dragons via Zoom

Join us via Zoom on Wednesdays from 4-6 p.m. for Dungeons & Dragons free for teens and young adults.  Contact claire@pagosalibrary.org for details on how to join.  

Children’s programs on Facebook

Every Wednesday at 10 a.m. and Saturday at 2:30 p.m., join us on the library’s Facebook page for free children’s programs.  Wednesday storytimes are on Facebook Live, so if you go to Facebook at 10 a.m. you can interact with Josie.  Saturday’s Discovery Times with games, art ideas, science experiments, history and more are prerecorded.   If you have a Facebook account, log in to Facebook and search for the Ruby Sisson Memorial Library. If you don’t have a Facebook account, access the page by visiting our website and clicking the Facebook icon (a lowercase f)  in the upper left hand corner of the screen. Or contact us and we can send you a direct link.  

Storywalks for kids

Every other Thursday, Josie posts signs outside the library that follow the sidewalk up towards the Elementary School detailing a new free Summer Reading Storywalk for kids.  The September 10-24 theme is making friends.  Get outdoors and follow the pages of a book as you stroll along.  After you finish, pick up materials for a craft or activity at the library.  By popular demand, Storywalks will continue until the snow makes it too difficult to proceed.

Books on CD

“The Midwife Murders” by James Patterson and Richard DiLallo is set in a university hospital in New York City.  “Choppy Water” by Stuart Woods is a Stone Barrington thriller.  “Get Sh*t Done” by Jeffrey Gitomer is a guide to productivity, procrastination and profitability.  “The Silent Wife” by Karin Slaughter is a mystery featuring a GBI investigator and a medical examiner.  “Humanocracy” by Gary Hamel and Michele Zanini documents how to replace bureaucracies so organizations can become bold, entrepreneurial and nimble.  “Near Dark” by Brad Thor is an adventure featuring Scot Harvath.  “A Private Cathedral” by James Lee Burke is a crime romance featuring Det. Dave Robicheaux.  “The Nemesis Manifesto” by Eric Van Lustbader is the beginning of a new thriller series.

Mysteries, suspense and thrillers

“Chaos” by Iris Johansen features a female CIA agent willing to go rogue if it means catching a killer.  “The Invention of Sound” by Chuck Palahniuk exposes the collision course that threatens to expose the violence beneath Hollywood’s glamorous façade.        

Other novels

“The Last Great Road Bum” by Hector Tobar is a novel based on the personal writings of Joe Sanderson.  “The Big Door Prize” by M.O. Walsh id a story of a mysterious machine that upends a small Louisiana town.

Nonfiction

“The Truth is Marching On”  by Pulitzer Prize winner Jon Meacham is a biography of civil rights activist John Lewis.  “More Alike Than Different” by David Egan is a memoir by a man with Down’s Syndrome who has become an advocate for all people with disabilities.  “Live Free or Die” by Fox News host Sean Hannity is a tribute to conservatism and a critique of the Democrats’ policies.  “Hoax: Donald Trump. Fox News and the Dangerous Distortion of Truth” by CNN anchor Brian Stelter explores the symbiotic relationship between Fox and the president.  “Blitz: Trump Will Smash the Left and Win” by Horowitz chronicles the left wing attacks on the president.  “The Answer Is… Reflections on My Life” by Alex Trebek is a memoir by the Jeopardy! host.

Downloadable e-books and audiobooks 

We have a wide variety of downloadable e-books and downloadable audio books for patrons of all ages – children, tweens, teens and adults.  Using cloudLibrary, you can download a book to read or an audio book to listen to.  The items in cloudLibrary are purchased separately from physical items, so the books available are different – and it continues to use the consortium’s contributions, not just those that we bought.  That is why you need to select AspenCat Union Catalog when setting up cloudLibrary for use.  Please email or phone us at 970-264-2209 if you need our help setting up this service on your device. 

Donations  

We are grateful to Sherry Spears for the generous monetary contribution in honor of Bud Forman, and to Medora Bass and our anonymous donors for books and other materials.  Please put your material donations into the dropbox at the library – not at City Market, which is reserved for returns.  Donations will undergo the same rigorous three-day quarantine process as returns.  

Quotable Quote

There are more than 9,000 public libraries across the United States — in cities, suburbs, rural areas and small towns. In surveys, libraries rank among the most trusted institutions in America. They assist with the census and offer voter registration services. They are open to everyone. They are nonpartisan. They are free.  Even in today’s fractured digital age, libraries rank among the most popular and well-visited places in our cultural landscape. According to a 2019 Gallup poll, on average, U.S. adults go to the library nearly once a month, making library visits ‘the most common cultural activity Americans engage in, by far.’”  — Dr. Eric Klinenberg, a sociologist at New York University, writing in The New York Times, September 3, 2010.

9/10/2020

Today:  Shift in Thursday hours and special census event

Starting today, Thursday, September 10, we are shifting our Thursday hours.  Instead of 9 a.m.-3 p.m. with 9-10 a.m. reserved for seniors and higher risk populations, we’ll be open from 1 p.m.- 7 p.m. with 1-2 p.m. reserved for seniors and higher risk populations. 

Being open late on Thursday allows us to add another evening of ESL instruction every Thursday from 4-7 p.m.

If you have a Tech Time appointment on Thursday, please phone from the parking lot or knock loudly on the front door to be let in.

Summary of partial reopening

Here’s more information about your library’s current operations: 

  • We are now accepting meeting room reservations for small groups, with library programs having first dibs on the rooms for our programs.  In addition, you can schedule only so far out, usually two weeks to a month, depending on where we are in the month. 
  • Up to 30 patrons at a time can come into the building.
  • Hand sanitizers are available and there will be frequent cleanings inside the building throughout the day.  Please practice social distancing and wear facial coverings while you are in the building.  If you don’t have a mask, we are happy to give one to you.
  • Nine computers are available. In most cases computer usage will be allowed for three hours per day. Staff will clean and disinfect the computers between uses.
  • One early literacy computer is available for youngsters Monday-Saturday.
  • For those not comfortable coming into the building, curbside service continues Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. except for Thursdays when it’s available from 9 a.m.-7 p.m., and on Saturday from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.  Phone 264-2209 when you are in the parking lot so staff can bring the items out for you.  If you put a hold on something, please wait for your usual alert (email, phone call or text) before coming to pick it up.  
  • You now can drop your returns of books, CDs and DVDs in the dropbox at City Market, as well as in the dropbox at the library.  No donations in the City Market box, please.
  • Notary service is available during open hours on Monday, Tuesday,  Friday and Saturday.  Cost is $5 per notary.
  • You can place holds on items from other libraries.  They are in different stages of reopening, so items may take longer than usual. 
  • We’re happy to provide tech help over the phone for our online resources.

Special census event today

Today, Thursday, September 10, from 1-4 p.m., representatives from the Census Bureau are at the library hosting a Mobile Questionnaire Assistance Station to help anyone who has not completed the census to do so and to answer questions about the census. This assistance station will be outside near the front entrance to the library. Our computers and a public phone inside the building will also be available to anyone needing to complete the census.

This special event comes at a perfect time to help you respond easily and conveniently to the census because Archuleta County’s response rate so far is not good – only 41.1% — compared to the much higher rate of 68.4% for the State of Colorado and 65% nationally.  If this poor showing continues we will not get our fair share of hundreds of billions of dollars in federal funds over next 10 years for local and regional agencies and projects like health clinics, fire departments, schools, social services like Medicaid, even roads and highways. 

Adding to the concern about our low participation is the fact that the deadline to respond to the census has been moved forward to September 30, so you do not have much time to participate if you have not already done so. 

It takes only 10 minutes to respond to the census online or by telephone – and  your answers are kept anonymous.  The law ensures that your private information is never published and that your answers cannot be used against you by any government agency or court.

Please contact Brad or Josie at the library if you have any census-related questions or visit 2020census.gov for more information.  And please take advantage of this special event if you have not filled out your census form.  Responding now will help decrease the number of homes census enumerators need to visit and will help ensure a more accurate count for our county. 

Legal clinic by phone or Zoom tomorrow

The free legal clinic each month is now by appointment and is happening tomorrow, Friday, September 11, from 2 – 3 p.m. by telephone or Zoom. You can choose to have the volunteer attorney phone you directly, or you can come into the library and meet via Zoom. To be added to the sign-up sheet for these calls, send an email titled “Sign-up for Free Legal Clinic,” with your first name and phone number to ruby@pagosalibrary.org, or phone or stop by the library. The volunteer attorney’s time is limited so it’s first-come first-served.

Suffrage poster display

We hope you’ll stop by the library to view a display of 10 suffrage posters celebrating the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment.  Titled “Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence,” the exhibition is a joint effort of the Smithsonian Museum and the National Portrait Gallery.  The crusade for women’s suffrage was one of the longest reform movements in U.S. history.  The posters will be on display until September 22 on the maroon wall behind the computers, on the other side of the checkout desk. 

Tech Time

Make a 15- or 30-minute appointment for one of three free in-person slots available noon-1 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Brad will help one person (or one couple) at a time.  If you have a Tech Time appointment on Thursday, phone from the parking lot or knock loudly on the front door to be let in.

ESL

Free in-person classes take place Tuesdays and Thursdays from 4-7 p.m. by appointment.  Please register so we can keep it to a small group in our limited open spaces.  No walk-ins, as the front door will be locked. 

Adult learning

GEDclasses plus HiSet, CDL and other free in-person tutoring from Mark is available on Tuesdays from 2-7 p.m. by appointment for both new and returning students. 

New day for Dungeons & Dragons

Join us via Zoom on Wednesdays from 4-6 p.m. for Dungeons & Dragons free for teens and young adults.  Contact claire@pagosalibrary.org for details on how to join.   Note day and time change from Tuesdays.

Children’s programs on Facebook

Every Wednesday at 10 a.m. and Saturday at 2:30 p.m., join us on the library’s Facebook page for free children’s programs.  Wednesday storytimes are on Facebook Live, so if you go to Facebook at 10 a.m. you can interact with Josie.  Saturday’s Discovery Times with games, art ideas, science experiments, history and more are prerecorded.   If you have a Facebook account, log in to Facebook and search for the Ruby Sisson Memorial Library. If you don’t have a Facebook account, access the page by visiting our website and clicking the Facebook icon (a lowercase f)  in the upper left hand corner of the screen. Or contact us and we can send you a direct link.  

Storywalks for kids

Every other Thursday, Josie, your early literacy librarian, posts signs outside the library that follow the sidewalk up towards the Elementary School detailing a new free Summer Reading Storywalk for kids.  The September 10-24 theme is making friends.  Get outdoors and follow the pages of a book as you stroll along.  After you finish, pick up materials for a craft or activity at the library.  By popular demand, Storywalks will continue until the snow makes it too difficult to proceed.

DVDs

“30 for 30” is Season II films 31-60 of this ESPN series.  “The Good Place” is season two.  “The Windermere Children” is based on a true story about Holocaust survivors.  “Belgravia” is the six-part PBS drama series.   “Tom Clancy’s Jack Ryan” is season two.  “The Good Doctor” is season three.  “His Dark Materials” is the first season of Philip Pullman’s epic fantasy.

Nonfiction

“The Wonder Book of Chemistry” by Jean-Henri Fabre is written to arouse young readers’ interest in science.  “25 Great Sentences and How They Got That Way” by Geraldine Woods looks at hundreds of memorable sentences from fiction, nonfiction, drama, poetry, songs, speeches and ads.  “The End of Alzheimer’s Program” by Dr. Dale E. Bredesen is designed to enhance cognition and reverse decline at any age.  “First Studies of Plant Life” by George Francis Atkinson is a reprint of this classic.  “Above the Clouds” by Kilian Jornet is a memoir by a climber who has broken almost every mountaineering record in the world.  “Livewired” by David Eagleman explores the magic of the brain.  “Superman’s Not Coming” by consumer activist Erin Brockovich details the our national water crisis and what we can do about it.

Story collections

“Daddy” by Emma Cline is a collection of 10 stories portraying moments when the ordinary is disturbed.  “The Spoilt Quilt and Other Frontier Stories,” edited by Hazel Rumney, is a collection of 16 new historical fiction stories about pioneering women of the west.  This is a large print book.

Other large print

“A Private Cathedral” by James Lee Burke is a Det. Dave Robicheaux mystery.  “Shot to Hell” by William W. and J.A. Johnstone is a Perley Gates western. 

Novels

“Where Dreams Descend” by Janella Angeles’s is the first book in a new Kingdom of Cards fantasy duology.  “Transcendent Kingdom” by Yaa Gyasi, a follow-up to “Homegoing,” is a story about a Ghanaian family in the contemporary South.   “Hotel Angeline” is a collaborate novel written by 36 Pacific Northwest writers. 

Books on CD

“The Order” by Daniel Silva is a Gabriel Allon mystery.  “Vesper Flights” by Helen Macdonald is a collection of essays about the human relationship to the natural world.  “Her Last Flight” by Beatriz Williams is the story of a lost pilot and a wartime photographer.  “Younger Next Year for Women” by Chris Crowley and Dr. Henry S. Lodge is the second edition of this guide to good health into your 80s.  “Big Summer” by Jennifer Weiner tells of friendship and forgiveness at a wedding on Cape Cod.  “Deadlock” by Catherine Coulter is a thriller featuring FBI agents Savich and Sherlock.  “Placing Nice” by JP Delaney starts with babies switched at birth.  “Half Moon Bay” by Jonathan and Jesse Kellerman begins with finding a decades-old skeleton of a child. “1st  Case” by James Patterson and Chris Tebbetts features a rookie FBI agent. 

Downloadable e-books and audiobooks 

We have a wide variety of downloadable e-books and downloadable audio books for patrons of all ages – children, tweens, teens and adults.  Using cloudLibrary, you can download a book to read or an audio book to listen to.  The items in cloudLibrary are purchased separately from physical items, so the books available are different – and it continues to use the consortium’s contributions, not just those that we bought.  That is why you need to select AspenCat Union Catalog when setting up cloudLibrary for use.  Please email or phone us at 970-264-2209 if you need our help setting up this service on your device. 

Donations  

We are grateful to Victor and Joanne Lucariello for their generous monetary contribution, and to our anonymous donors for books and other materials.  Please put your material donations into the dropbox at the library – not at City Market, which is reserved for returns.  Donations will undergo the same rigorous three-day quarantine process as returns.  

Quotable Quote

“Ideals are like stars – you can’t reach them, but they can guide the way.” – Japanese proverb.

9/2/2020

How to help your babies and toddlers grow up loving to read

A New York Times article headlined “How to Raise a Reader” by Pamela Paul and Marcia Russo offers easy and practical tips on how you can make sure your young children grow up loving to read.

For babies:  Even newborns benefit from hearing stories.  Read out loud every day.  Any book will do – even an adult one.  What matters is not the content but the sound of your voice, the cadence of the text and the words themselves. 

Research shows that the number of words an infant is exposed to has a direct impact on language development and literacy.  But note that the language has to be live – not from TV or an audio book.

For toddlers:  It’s hard to overestimate how important reading is to a toddler’s intellectual, social and emotional development.  When you read to them, they take it all in – vocabulary and language structure, numbers and math concepts, colors, shapes, animals and all kinds of useful information on how the world works.  And when you read out loud, your toddler connects books with the familiar, beloved sound of your voice, and the physical closeness that reading together brings. 

Let your child turn the pages and choose the books he or she likes best.  Then try to steer them to other books as well, especially books about other children living in a variety of cultural traditions and family structures that coexist in our communities.  Exposing children to diversity in books will prepare them for life in a diverse world.

Every Library News column contains information about activities for children that let them have fun while increasing their literacy levels.  We hope you and your family are  taking advantage of them.

Census deadline looming

This is the last month to respond to the census – and your participation is badly needed because Archuleta County’s response rate so far is not good – only 40.9% — compared to the much higher rate of 68% for the State of Colorado and 64.6% nationally. If our poor showing continues we will not get our fair share of hundreds of billions of dollars in federal funds over next 10 years for local and regional agencies and projects like health clinics, fire departments, schools, social services like Medicaid, even roads and highways. 

Adding to the concern about our low participation is the fact that the deadline to respond to the census has been moved forward to September 30, so you do not have much time to participate if you have not already done so. 

It takes only 10 minutes to respond to the census online or by telephone – and  your answers are kept anonymous.  The law ensures that your private information is never published and that your answers cannot be used against you by any government agency or court.

Please contact Brad or Josie at the library if you have any census-related questions or visit 2020census.gov for more information.  Responding now will help decrease the number of homes census enumerators need to visit and will help ensure a more accurate count. 

Suffrage poster display

We hope you’ll stop by the library to view a display of 10 suffrage posters celebrating the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment.  Titled “Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence,” the exhibition is a joint effort of the Smithsonian Museum and the National Portrait Gallery.  The crusade for women’s suffrage was one of the longest reform movements in U.S. history.  The posters will be on display until September 22 on the maroon wall behind the computers, on the other side of the checkout desk. 

Meeting rooms now available – plus more on our partial re-open

Here’s a summary of your library’s current operations.  Note the first item, which is a change regarding meeting room reservations.

  • We are now accepting meeting room reservations for small groups.  The guidelines are the same as they were PC (pre-COVID) in terms of library programs having first dibs on the rooms for our programs.  In addition, people can schedule only so far out, which is usually two weeks to a month, depending on where we are in the month. 
  • Up to 30 patrons at a time can come into the building Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
  • The first hour every weekday – from 9-10 a.m. – is reserved for seniors and other high-risk people.
  • Hand sanitizers are available and there will be frequent cleanings inside the building throughout the day.  Please practice social distancing and wear facial coverings while you are in the building.  If you don’t have a mask, we are happy to give one to you.
  • Nine computers, up from eight, are available weekdays from 9 a.m.-2 p.m.. In most cases computer usage will be allowed for three hours per day, up from two. Staff will clean and disinfect the computers between uses.
  • One early literacy computer is available for youngsters Monday-Saturday.
  • Saturday hours are 10 a.m.-2 p.m. for building entry and 10 a.m.-1 p.m. for computer use.
  • Curbside service continues Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. for those not comfortable coming into the building  Phone 264-2209 when you are in the parking lot so staff can bring the items out for you.  If you put a hold on something, please wait for your usual alert (email, phone call or text) before coming to pick it up.  
  • Our courier service has resumed, so you now can drop your returns of books, CDs and DVDs in the dropbox at City Market, as well as in the dropbox at the library.  No donations in the City Market box, please.
  • Notary Public Service is available Mondays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays from 10 a.m.-3 p.m..  Cost is $5 per notary.
  • You can place holds on items from other libraries.  They are in different stages of courier service and reopening, so items may take longer than usual. 
  • We’re happy to provide tech help over the phone for our online resources.

Ruby’s Book Club via Zoom

On Tuesday, September 8 from 1-2 p.m. our free adult book club takes place via Zoom when we discuss “The Monk of Mokha” by Dave Eggers.  Contact brad@pagosalibrary.org if you want to attend or need a copy of the book.  This book club meets the second Tuesday of every month.

Tech Time

Make a 15- or 30-minute appointment for one of three free in-person slots available noon-1 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Brad will help one person (or one couple) at a time. 

ESL

Free in-person classes take place Tuesdays from 4-7 p.m. by appointment.  Please register so we can keep it to a small group in our limited open spaces.  No walk-ins, as the front door will be locked. 

Adult learning

GEDclasses plus HiSet, CDL and other free in-person tutoring from Mark is available on Tuesdays from 2-7 p.m. by appointment for both new and returning students. 

New day for Dungeons & Dragons

Join us via Zoom on Wednesdays from 4-6 p.m. for Dungeons & Dragons free for teens and young adults.  Contact claire@pagosalibrary.org for details on how to join.   Note day and time change from Tuesdays.

Children’s programs on Facebook

Every Wednesday at 10 a.m. and Saturday at 2:30 p.m., join us on the library’s Facebook page for free children’s programs.  Wednesday storytimes are on Facebook Live, so if you go to Facebook at 10 a.m. you can interact with Josie.  Saturday’s Discovery Times with games, art ideas, science experiments, history and more are prerecorded.   If you have a Facebook account, log in to Facebook and search for the Ruby Sisson Memorial Library. If you don’t have a Facebook account, access the page by visiting our website and clicking the Facebook icon (a lowercase f)  in the upper left hand corner of the screen. Or contact us and we can send you a direct link.  

Storywalks for kids

Every other Thursday, Josie, your early literacy librarian, posts signs outside the library that follow the sidewalk up towards the Elementary School detailing a new free Summer Reading Storywalk for kids.  The September 3-17 theme is making friends.  Get outdoors and follow the pages of a book as you stroll along.  After you finish, pick up materials for a craft or activity at the library.  By popular demand, Storywalks will continue until the snow makes it too difficult to proceed.

Legal clinic by phone or Zoom

The free legal clinic each month is now by appointment and is happening next Friday, September 11, from 2 – 3 p.m. by telephone or Zoom. You can choose to have the volunteer attorney phone you directly, or you can come into the library and meet via Zoom. To be added to the sign-up sheet for these calls, send an email titled “Sign-up for Free Legal Clinic,” with your first name and phone number to ruby@pagosalibrary.org, or phone or stop by the library. The volunteer attorney’s time is limited so it’s first-come first-served.

Books on CD

“Firestick” by William W. and J.A. Johnstone is the start of a new western series.  “Hot Lead, Cold Justice” by Mickey Spillane and Max Allan Collins is a Caleb York western.  “Outlaw Town” by David Robbins is a Ralph Compton western.  “A Walk Along the Beach” by Debbie Macomber features two sisters who are polar opposites.  “The Lost and Found Bookshop” by Susan Wiggs is set in a San Francisco bookstore.  “28 Summers” by Elin Hilderbrand begins with deathbed instructions to a son.  “Friends and Strangers” by J. Courtney Sullivan follows a young mother adjusting to life in a small town after New York City.  “Royal” by Danielle Steel tells of an English princess sent to the country during World War II.

Nonfiction

“We Should Have Seen It Coming” by Gerald F. Sieb documents the rise of the conservative movement from Reagan to Trump.  “The Nature of Nature” by marine ecologist Enric Sala shows why preserving earth’s biodiversity makes logical, emotional and economic sense. 

Mysteries, suspense and thrillers

“Three Perfect Liars” by Heidi Perks is a suspense set in an advertising agency.  “Squeeze Me” by Carl Haasen is features social and political intrigue among the Palm Beach social set.  “Thick as Thieves” by Sandra Brown follows a woman whose father was suspected of a massive burglary 20 years ago. 

Other novels

“The Exiles” by Christina Baker Kline features a trio of women in 19th century Australia. 

Downloadable e-books and audiobooks 

Ever since March, we have been buying more downloadable e-books and downloadable audio books for patrons of all ages – children, tweens, teens and adults.  Using cloudLibrary, you can download a book to read or an audio book to listen to.  The items in cloudLibrary are purchased separately from physical items, so the books available are different – and it continues to use the consortium’s contributions, not just those that we bought.  That is why you need to select AspenCat Union Catalog when setting up cloudLibrary for use.  Please email or phone us at 970-264-2209 if you need our help setting up this service on your device. 

Donations  

Please put your donations of materials into the dropbox at the library – not at City Market, which is reserved for returns.  Donations will undergo the same rigorous three-day quarantine process as returns.  

Quotable Quote

“The greatest danger for most of us lies not in setting our aim too high and falling short; but in setting our aim too low, and achieving our mark.”  Michelangelo (1475-1564), Italian artist, sculptor and architect.

8/27/2020

Best back-to-school gift, census event today and suffrage posters display

Do you know the value of a home library for your youngsters?  Research shows that kids who have books in their home have improved vocabulary and overall reading performance; do better in math, science and social studies; perform better on standardized tests and are more likely to go to college.

Those are impressive skills for your child to cultivate – and they are especially relevant now that Archuleta County kids are returning to school amid all the uncertainties and potential academic losses of the COVID-19 coronavirus environment.

Another valuable tip to help your youngster be successful in school and in life – reading aloud.  You are stimulating language and literacy skills, as well as building motivation, curiosity and memory. 

The free storytimes at your library can help build a love of reading in your children.  Family storytimes for kids of all ages happen on Wednesdays at 10 a.m. on Facebook Live and on Saturdays at 2:30 p.m. on Facebook. Storytime is a great way for kids to have fun while building the skills they need to become independent readers.  

As we start the new school year, this may be a good time for parents, grandparents and other caregivers to make a personal resolution to help build home libraries for your loved ones.

Census event today

Today, Thursday, August 27 from noon to 3 p.m., representatives from the Census Bureau are at the library hosting a Mobile Questionnaire Assistance Station to help anyone who has not completed the census to do so and to answer questions about the census. This assistance station will be outside near the front entrance of the library. Our computers and a public phone inside the building will also be available to anyone needing to complete the census.

This special event comes at a perfect time to help you respond easily and conveniently to the census because Archuleta County’s response rate so far is not good – only 40.3% — compared to the much higher rate of 67.5% for the State of Colorado.  If this poor showing continues we will not get our fair share of hundreds of billions of dollars in federal funds over next 10 years for local and regional agencies and projects like health clinics, fire departments, schools, social services like Medicaid, even roads and highways. 

Adding to the concern about our low participation is the fact that the deadline to respond to the census has been moved forward to September 30, so you do not have much time to participate if you have not already done so. 

It takes only 10 minutes to respond to the census online or by telephone – and  your answers are kept anonymous.  The law ensures that your private information is never published and that your answers cannot be used against you by any government agency or court.

Please contact Brad or Josie at the library if you have any census-related questions or visit 2020census.gov for more information.  And please take advantage of this special event if you have not filled out your census form.  Responding now will help decrease the number of homes census enumerators need to visit and will help ensure a more accurate count. 

Suffrage poster display

We hope you’ll stop by the library to view a display of 10 suffrage posters celebrating the 100th anniversary of the 19th amendment.  Titled “Votes for Women: A Portrait of Persistence,” the exhibition is a joint effort of the Smithsonian Museum and the National Portrait Gallery.  The crusade for women’s suffrage was one of the longest reform movements in U.S. history.  The posters will be on display until September 22 on the maroon wall behind the computers, on the other side of the checkout desk. 

Community art project today

We hope you will join us for a collaborative creations project starting today, August 27, and continuing through September 4 as we create temporary community art projects together.  Three to five projects will be set up outside the library with instructions encouraging everyone to add to the art projects that will include a chalk drawing, stained glass creation, add-a-scale dragon and more.

Creations and instructions on how to add to them will be up for a week, weather permitting. Community members of all ages are invited to participate.

Details of our partial re-open

Here’s a summary of your library’s current operations:

  • Up to 30 patrons at a time can come into the building Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
  • The first hour every weekday – from 9-10 a.m. – is reserved for seniors and other high-risk people.
  • Hand sanitizers are available and there will be frequent cleanings inside the building throughout the day.  Please practice social distancing and wear facial coverings while you are in the building.  If you don’t have a mask, we are happy to give one to you.
  • Nine computers, up from eight, are available weekdays from 9 a.m.-2 p.m.. In most cases computer usage will be allowed for three hours per day, up from two. Staff will clean and disinfect the computers between uses.
  • One early literacy computer is available for youngsters Monday-Saturday.
  • Saturday hours are 10 a.m.-2 p.m. for building entry and 10 a.m.-1 p.m. for computer use.
  • Curbside service continues Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. for those not comfortable coming into the building  Phone 264-2209 when you are in the parking lot so staff can bring the items out for you.  If you put a hold on something, please wait for your usual alert (email, phone call or text) before coming to pick it up.  
  • Our courier service has resumed, so you now can drop your returns of books, CDs and DVDs in the dropbox at City Market, as well as in the dropbox at the library.  No donations in the City Market box, please.
  • Notary Public Service is available Mondays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays from 10 a.m.-3 p.m..  Cost is $5 per notary.
  • You can place holds on items from other libraries.  They are in different stages of courier service and reopening, so items may take longer than usual. 
  • We’re happy to provide tech help over the phone for our online resources. 
  •  Please note we are not accepting meeting room reservations or hosting any large in-person programming at this time.  

Tech Time

Make a 15- or 30-minute appointment for one of three free in-person slots available noon-1 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Brad will help one person (or one couple) at a time. 

ESL

Free in-person classes take place Tuesdays from 4-7 p.m. by appointment.  Please register so we can keep it to a small group in our limited open spaces.  No walk-ins, as the front door will be locked. 

Adult learning

GEDclasses plus HiSet, CDL and other free in-person tutoring from Mark is available on Tuesdays from 2-7 p.m. by appointment for both new and returning students. 

New day and time for Dungeons & Dragons

Join us via Zoom on Wednesdays from 4-6 p.m. for Dungeons & Dragons free for teens and young adults.  Contact claire@pagosalibrary.org for details on how to join.   Note day and time change from Tuesdays.

Children’s programs on Facebook

Every Wednesday at 10 a.m. and Saturday at 2:30 p.m., join us on the library’s Facebook page for free children’s programs.  Wednesday storytimes are on Facebook Live, so if you go to Facebook at 10 a.m. you can interact with Josie.  Saturday’s Discovery Times with games, art ideas, science experiments, history and more are prerecorded.   If you have a Facebook account, log in to Facebook and search for the Ruby Sisson Memorial Library. If you don’t have a Facebook account, access the page by visiting our website and clicking the Facebook icon (a lowercase f)  in the upper left hand corner of the screen. Or contact us and we can send you a direct link.  

Storywalks for kids

Every other Thursday, Josie, your early literacy librarian, posts signs outside the library that follow the sidewalk up towards the Elementary School detailing a new free Summer Reading Storywalk for kids.  The August 20-September 3 theme as school starts is new beginnings.  Get outdoors and follow the pages of a book as you stroll along.  After you finish, pick up materials for a craft or activity at the library.  By popular demand, Storywalks will continue until the snow makes it too difficult to proceed.

Nonfiction

“The Genius Life” by health and science journalist Max Lugavere is a lifestyle program for resetting your brain and body.  “The Organ Thieves” by Chip Jones is the shocking story of the first heart transplant in the segregated south.  “Migraines Be Gone” by Kelsie Kenefick offers seven steps to taking control of your migraine headaches.  “How to Thrive in Spite of Mess, Stress, and Less!” by Patti Fralix provides techniques to help you find your passion, productivity and prosperity.

“The Fallacy Detective” by Nathaniel and Hans Bluedorn for ages 12 through adult offers 38 lessons on how to recognize bad reasoning and includes a game.  “The Islam Book” is a DK guide to the world’s fastest-growing religion.  “What’s Your Enneatype?” by Liz Carver and John Green describes nine personality types for personal growth.  “Separated” by award-winning journalist Jacob Soboroff is a first-hand report of the separation of migrant families at the U.S.-Mexico border. 

Large print

“The Girl From Widow Hills” by Megan Miranda is a mystery.  “Yes, I Do” by Janet Dailey contains two romances.  “Deadlock” by Catherine Coulter is an FBI thriller.  “The Friendship List” by Susan Mallery features a single mom.  “Near Dark” by Brad Thor is a Scot Harvath thriller.  “Choppy Water” by Stuart Woods is a Stone Barrington mystery.  “Hi Five” by Joe Ide is an Isaiah Quintabe mystery. 

Mysteries, suspense and thrillers

“Atomic Love” by Jennie Fields centers on a Manhattan Project scientist suspected of being a Russian spy.  “The Less Dead” by Denise Mina begins with a search for a birth mother. 

Other novels

“Beneath a Scarlet Sky” by Mark Sullivan features a young Italian man who becomes Hilter’s personal driver and a spy.  “Memoirs an Misinformation” is a semiautobiographical comedic novel by Jim Carrey and Dana Vachon.  “Royal” by Danielle Steel follows an English princess sent to the countryside for safety during World War II. 

Downloadable e-books and audiobooks 

Ever since March, we have been buying more downloadable e-books and downloadable audio books for patrons of all ages – children, tweens, teens and adults.  Using cloudLibrary, you can download a book to read or an audio book to listen to.  The items in cloudLibrary are purchased separately from physical items, so the books available are different – and it continues to use the consortium’s contributions, not just those that we bought.  That is why you need to select AspenCat Union Catalog when setting up cloudLibrary for use.  Please email or phone us at 970-264-2209 if you need our help setting up this service on your device. 

Donations  

We are grateful to Rusty Albers for the generous gift in memory of Susan Haney, and to Rice Reavis for the generous gift in memory of Tracy Reavis.  Please put your donations of materials into the dropbox at the library – not at City Market, which is reserved for returns.  Donations will undergo the same rigorous three-day quarantine process as returns.  

Quotable Quote

“Consistency is the last refuge of the unimaginative.” – Oscar Wilde (1854-1900), Irish poet and playwright.

8/20/20

Special census event and community art project

Next Thursday, August 27 from noon to 3 p.m., representatives from the Census Bureau will be at the library hosting a Mobile Questionnaire Assistance Station to help anyone who has not completed the census to do so and to answer questions about the census. This assistance station will be outside near the front entrance of the library. Our computers and a public phone inside the building will also be available to anyone needing to complete the census.

This special event comes at a perfect time to help you respond easily and conveniently to the census because Archuleta County’s response rate so far is not good – only 39.8% — compared th the much higher rate of 66.9% for the State of Colorado and 63.5% for the U.S. overall.  If this poor showing continues we will not get our fair share of hundreds of billions of dollars in federal funds over next 10 years for local and regional agencies and projects like health clinics, fire departments, schools, social services like Medicaid, even roads and highways. 

Adding to the concern about our low participation is the fact that the deadline to respond to the census has been moved forward to September 30, so you do not have much time to participate if you have not already done so. 

When you respond to the census online or by telephone, your answers are kept anonymous.  The law ensures that your private information is never published and that your answers cannot be used against you by any government agency or court.

Please contact Brad or Josie at the library if you have any census-related questions or visit 2020census.gov for more information.  And please take advantage of this special event if you have not filled out your census form.  Responding now will help decrease the number of homes census enumerators need to visit and will help ensure a more accurate count. 

Community art project

We hope you will join us for a collaborative creations project from August 27-September 4 as we create temporary community art projects together.  Three to five projects will be set up outside the library with instructions encouraging everyone to add to the art projects that will include a chalk drawing, stained glass creation, add-a-scale dragon and more.

Creations and instructions on how to add to them will be up for a week, weather permitting. Community members of all ages are invited to participate.

Cardboard car race

Today, August 20, is the last day to participate in our free all-ages cardboard car race.  Pick up the materials to make your own cardboard car, and then return to race on the track set up outside the library.

Summer Reading Program

It’s not too late to sign up for the free all-ages Summer Reading Program, which  is extended through the end of August, a decision that came from a desire to bring continued learning and fun to our community throughout the summer, according to Meg Wempe, director.  “It also provides more opportunity for us to purchase gift certificates from local businesses for our prizes to do our small part to help economic recovery,” she said.

Call us at (970) 264-2209, email ruby@pagosalibrary.org or register online at pagosalibrary.org/summer-reading. We need to know your name, contact information, and what age group to assign you to.  You will receive a “choose your own adventure” booklet with fun activities and challenges. Completing them makes you eligible to win weekly prizes. There are adventure booklets for four groups: pre-K, K-5, teen and adult.

Details of our partial re-open

Here’s a summary of your library’s current operations:

  • Up to 30 patrons at a time can come into the building Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.-3 p.m.
  • The first hour every weekday – from 9-10 a.m. – is reserved for seniors and other high-risk people.
  • Hand sanitizers are available and there will be frequent cleanings inside the building throughout the day.  Please practice social distancing and wear facial coverings while you are in the building.  If you don’t have a mask, we are happy to give one to you.
  • Eight computers are available weekdays from 9 a.m.-2 p.m.. In most cases computer usage will be allowed for three hours per day, up from two. Staff will clean and disinfect the computers between uses.
  • One early literacy computer is available for youngsters Monday-Saturday.
  • Saturday hours are 10 a.m.-2 p.m. for building entry and 10 a.m.-1 p.m. for computer use.
  • Curbside service continues Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. for those not comfortable coming into the building  Phone 264-2209 when you are in the parking lot so staff can bring the items out for you.  If you put a hold on something, please wait for your usual alert (email, phone call or text) before coming to pick it up.  
  • Our courier service has resumed, so you now can drop your returns of books, CDs and DVDs in the dropbox at City Market, as well as in the dropbox at the library.  No donations in the City Market box, please.
  • Notary Public Service is available Mondays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays from 10 a.m.-3 p.m..  Cost is $5 per notary.
  • You can place holds on items from other libraries.  They are in different stages of courier service and reopening, so items may take longer than usual. 
  • We’re happy to provide tech help over the phone for our online resources. 
  •  Please note we are not accepting meeting room reservations or hosting any large in-person programming at this time. 

Tech Time

Make a 15- or 30-minute appointment for one of three free in-person slots available noon-1 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Brad will help one person (or one couple) at a time. 

ESL

Free in-person classes take place Tuesdays from 4-7 p.m. by appointment.  Please register so we can keep it to a small group in our limited open spaces.  No walk-ins, as the front door will be locked. 

GED and other tutoring

GEDclasses plus HiSet, CDL and other free in-person tutoring from Mark is available on Tuesdays from 2-7 p.m. by appointment for both new and returning students. 

Dungeons & Dragons via Zoom

Join us via Zoom on Tuesdays from 3-5 p.m. for Dungeons & Dragons free for teens and young adults.  Contact claire@pagosalibrary.org for details on how to join.  

Children’s programs on Facebook

Every Wednesday at 10 a.m. and Saturday at 2:30 p.m., join us on the library’s Facebook page for free children’s programs.  Wednesday storytimes are on Facebook Live, so if you go to Facebook at 10 a.m. you can interact with Josie.  Saturday’s Discovery Times with games, art ideas, science experiments, history and more are prerecorded.   If you have a Facebook account, log in to Facebook and search for the Ruby Sisson Memorial Library. If you don’t have a Facebook account, access the page by visiting our website and clicking the Facebook icon (a lowercase f)  in the upper left hand corner of the screen. Or contact us and we can send you a direct link.  

Storywalks for kids

Every other Thursday, Josie, your early literacy librarian, posts signs outside the library that follow the sidewalk up towards the Elementary School detailing a new free Summer Reading Storywalk for kids.  The August 20-September 4 theme as school starts is new beginnings.  Get outdoors and follow the pages of a book as you stroll along.  After you finish, pick up materials for a craft or activity at the library.  By popular demand, Storywalks will continue until the snow makes it too difficult to proceed.

Mysteries, suspense and thrillers

“The Last Mrs. Summers” by Rhys Bowen is a Royal Spyness Gothic mystery.  “The Eighth Detective” by Alex Pavesi features an author of detective stories.  “The Hollow Ones” by Guillermo del Toro and Chuck Hogan launches a new Blackwood Tapes FBI series.  “Sucker Punch” by Laurell K. Hamilton is an Anita Blake Vampire Hunter mystery.  “Long Bright River” by Liz Moore features two sisters, one an opioid addict and the other a police officer.  “The Midwife Murders” by James Patterson and Richard DiLallo takes place at a hospital in NYC.

Other novels

“The Death of Vivek Oji” by Akwaeke Emezi opens with the death of a young Nigerian boy. “The Comeback” by Ella Berman features a young actress overly influenced by a manipulative film director.  “The Lost Girls of Paris” by Pam Jenoff is the story of female secret agents during World War II, inspired by real events.

Books on CD

“Credible Threat” by J.A. Jance is an Ali Reynolds mystery.  “The Lies That Bind” by Emily Giffin is about the search for a man who goes missing after 9/11.  “A Week at the Shore” by Barbara Delinsky follows a woman reuniting with her estranged family.  “On Ocean Boulevard” by Mary Alice Monroe is a family saga on the Isle of Palms.  “Hideaway” by Nora Roberts is set on a family ranch in Big Sur.  “Lucky’s Beach” by Shelley Noble begins when an elderly surfer goes missing. “The Simple Shift” by Chris Helder is a guide to “useful thinking.” 

DVDs

“Death in Paradise” is season eight.  “Stranger Things” follows the people in a mall one summer.  “The Good Karma Hospital” is series three.  “This is Us” is the first season.

Nonfiction

“Caste: The Origins of Our Discontents” by Pulitzer Prize-winner Isabel Wilkerson examines the unspoken caste system in the U.S. “Make Change” by Shaun King looks at social moments that have shaped the life of this Black Lives Matter leader.  “What Are the Odds?” by Mike Lindell is the memoir of a man who went from crack addict to CEO with the help of God.  “I Have Something to Say” by John Bowe is a guide to public speaking in an age of disconnection. 

Downloadable e-books and audiobooks 

Ever since March, we have been buying more downloadable e-books and downloadable audio books for patrons of all ages – children, tweens, teens and adults.  Using cloudLibrary, you can download a book to read or an audio book to listen to.  The items in cloudLibrary are purchased separately from physical items, so the books available are different – and it continues to use the consortium’s contributions, not just those that we bought.  That is why you need to select AspenCat Union Catalog when setting up cloudLibrary for use.  Please email or phone us at 970-264-2209 if you need our help setting up this service on your device. 

Donations

We are grateful to W.C. and Clareve Enmon as well as our anonymous donors for their donations of materials.  Please put your donations into the dropbox at the library – not at City Market, which is reserved for returns.  Donations will undergo the same rigorous three-day quarantine process as returns.  

Quotable Quote

“I’m glad I studied philosophy.  I think that a philosophical outlook will help you no matter what you are doing … in terms of acknowledging some sense of perspective in your life and in the world around you.  I have always tried to approach life with what I call the ‘reasonable-man attitude.’  If you have some sense of perspective, you are not likely to get too high or too low.” – Jeopardy! host Alex Trebek in his autobiography “The Answer Is… Reflections on My Life,” which is in the Sisson Library collection.

8/6/2020

City Market dropbox reopens plus cardboard car race and costume contest

You will be pleased to know that our courier service is resuming three times a week, which means you now can drop your returns of books, CDs and DVDs in the dropbox at City Market.  Of course you can continue to bring them to the dropbox at the library as well.  Your City Market returns will undergo the same rigorous three-day quarantine process as returns at the library.  

Cardboard car race and costume contest

If the COVIC-19 restrictions are getting you down, we have two fun free new events for you.

August 13-20 we’re hosting an all-ages cardboard car race.  Pick up the materials to make your own cardboard car, and then return to race on the track set up outside the library.

If you love to dress up or create costumes, select a character and deck yourself out like your character for this “cosplay” contest, a term used for dressing up as a way of expressing something that matters to you and expressing your character in mannerisms or speech.  From August 10-14 submit a picture of youself in your cosplay to ruby@pagosalibrary.org or drop by the library as we will take a picture of you.  Prizes will be awarded in a variety of categories including superheroes, fantasy, animated characters, anime/manga and more.  Contact the library for more guidelines and rules.

Archuleta census response very low

As of July 29, only 39.2% of Archuleta County households had completed the census.  Archuleta County needs your help because this is a very low response rate so far into the census process.

Your participation directly affects hundreds of billions of dollars in federal funding for the next 10 years for local and regional agencies and projects like health clinics, fire departments, schools, social services like Medicaid, even roads and highways.  Our county needs your participation to get our fair share of these federal dollars. If you have not already completed this important questionnaire, please do so at your earliest convenience.

When you respond to the census, your answers are kept anonymous.  The law ensures that your private information is never published and that your answers cannot be used against you by any government agency or court.

The deadline to complete the census online or by telephone has been extended to October 31.  Please contact Brad or Josie at the library if you have any census-related questions or visit 2020census.gov for more information.

Summer Reading Program

The free all-ages Summer Reading Program at your library has been extended through the end of August, a decision that came from a desire to bring continued learning and fun to our community throughout the summer, according to Meg Wempe, director.  “It also provides more opportunity for us to purchase gift certificates from local businesses for our prizes to do our small part to help economic recovery,” she said.

If you haven’t already signed up, we hope you’ll take this opportunity to join us now.  You will receive a “choose your own adventure” booklet with fun activities and challenges. Completing them makes you eligible to win weekly prizes purchased from local businesses.  There are adventure booklets for four groups: pre-K, K-5, teen and adult.

To sign up, call us at (970) 264-2209, email ruby@pagosalibrary.org or register online at pagosalibrary.org/summer-reading. We need to know your name, contact information, and what age group to assign you to.

Details of our partial re-open

Here’s a summary of your library’s current operations:

  • Up to 30 patrons at a time can come into the building Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. to return books, browse, register for a new library card, make copies, send FAXs, pick up tax forms and check out materials like books, DVDs, CDs and periodicals.
  • The first hour every weekday – from 9-10 a.m. – is reserved for seniors and other high-risk people.
  • Eight computers are available weekdays from 9 a.m.-2 p.m., three by advance appointment and five for walk-ins.  Call us at 264-2209 or email ruby@pagosalibrary.org to schedule a time. In most cases computer usage will be limited to two hours per day. Staff will clean and disinfect the computers between uses.
  • One early literacy computer is available for youngsters on a walk-in basis Monday-Saturday.
  • Saturday hours are 10 a.m.-2 p.m. for building entry and 10 a.m.-1 p.m. for computer use.
  • Curbside service continues Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. for those not comfortable coming into the building  Phone 264-2209 when you are in the parking lot so staff can bring the items out for you.  If you put a hold on something, please wait for your usual alert (email, phone call or text) before coming to pick it up.  
  • Hand sanitizers are available and there will be frequent cleanings inside the building throughout the day.  Please  practice social distancing and wear facial coverings while you are in the building.  If you don’t have a mask, we are happy to give one to you.
  • Notary Public Service is available Mondays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays from 10 a.m.-3 p.m..  Cost is $5 per notary.
  • Tech time, ESL and GED are available.  See details below.
  • You can place holds on items from other libraries.  They are in different stages of courier service and reopening, so items may take longer than usual. 
  • If you do not have a library card but want to use our online resources, you can self-register.  From our website, click “My Account” in the top right.  It is the usual login page for current patrons, and it now has (in blue) an option to “Register for a new Library Card.”  There’s a short form and then staff will get back in touch with you to provide your login credentials.  If you previously self-registered, you now can pick up your physical card after providing proof of address.
  • We’re happy to provide tech help over the phone for our online resources. 
  •  Please note we are not accepting meeting room reservations or hosting any large in-person programming at this time. 

Ruby’s Book Club via Zoom

On Tuesday, August 11 from 1-2 p.m. our adult book club resumes via Zoom when we discuss “Circe” by Madeline Miller.  Contact brad@pagosalibrary.org if you want to attend or need a copy of the book.  This book club meets the second Tuesday of every month.

Tech Time

Make an appointment for one of three slots available noon-1 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Brad will help one person (or one couple) at a time. 

ESL

In-person classes take place Tuesdays from 4-7 p.m.  Please register so we can keep it to a small group in our limited open spaces.  No walk-ins, as the front door will be locked. 

GED and other tutoring

GEDclasses plus HiSET, CDL and other in-person tutoring from Mark is available on Tuesdays from 2-7 p.m. by appointment for both new and returning students. 

Dungeons & Dragons via Zoom

Join us via Zoom on Tuesdays from 3-5 p.m. for Dungeons & Dragons open to teens and young adults.  Contact claire@pagosalibrary.org for details on how to join.  

Children’s programs on Facebook

Every Wednesday at 10 a.m. and Saturday at 2:30 p.m., join us on the library’s Facebook page.  Wednesday storytimes are now on Facebook Live, so if you go to Facebook at 10 a.m. you can interact with Josie.  Saturday’s Discovery Times with games, art ideas, science experiments, history and more are prerecorded.   If you have a Facebook account, log in to Facebook and search for the Ruby Sisson Memorial Library. If you don’t have a Facebook account, access the page by visiting our website and clicking the Facebook icon (a lowercase f)  in the upper left hand corner of the screen. Or contact us and we can send you a direct link.  

Storywalks for kids

Every other Thursday, Josie, your early literacy librarian, posts signs outside the library that follow the sidewalk up towards the Elementary School detailing a new Summer Reading Storywalk for kids.  The August 6-20  theme is glow in the dark adventures.   Get outdoors and follow the pages of a book as you stroll along.  After you finish, pick up materials for a craft or activity at the library.  By popular demand, Storywalks will continue until the snow makes it too difficult to proceed.

Free legal clinic by appointment

The free legal clinic previously held at your library each month is now by appointment on August 14 from 2 – 3 p.m. Instead of patrons coming in to the library, the volunteer attorney will phone you directly. To be added to the sign-up sheet for these calls, send an email titled “Sign-up for Free Legal Clinic,” with your first name and phone number to ruby@pagosalibrary.org, or phone or stop by the library. The volunteer attorney’s time is limited, so the first to sign up will be the first served. Our volunteer attorney can answer your questions related to civil law including unemployment benefits, landlord-tenant issues and more.  

Mysteries, suspense and thrillers

“He Started It” by Samantha Downing follows siblings, one a killer, at a reunion after a family death.  “The Order” by Daniel Silva is a Gabriel Allon thriller.  “Cajun Justice” by James Patterson and Tucker Axum is set in the Louisiana bayou.  “The End of Her” by Shari Lapena follows a couple after a woman from his past shows up with accusations.  “Robert Ludlum’s The Bourne Evolution” by Brian Freeman is a Jason Bourne thriller.  “Placing Nice” by JP Delaney is a psychological thriller about babies switched at birth.

Other novels

“True Places” by Sonja Yoerg begins when a mother encounters a young girl on the Blue Ridge Parkway.  “Girls of Summer” by Nancy Thayer is a family story set on Nantucket.  “What You Wish For” by Katherine Center features a new school principal who’s become a rule-enforcing tough guy. 

Nonfiction

“Defender in Chief” by John Yoo is an exploration of presidential power and defense of Trump’s actions.  “Twilight of Democracy” by Pulitzer Prize-winning historian Anne Applebaum explains the world’s shift to authoritarianism.   “Bright Precious Thing” by Pulitzer Prize winning author  Gail Caldwell is a memoir about how the woman’s movement revolutionized and saved her life.  “White Too Long” by Robert P. Jones is an analysis of the relationship between Christianity and white supremacy. 

“The Unidentified” by cultural historian Colin Dickey looks at our obsession with monsters, aliens and other unexplained phenomenon.  “Love and Meaning After 50” by Drs. Julia L. Mayer and Barry J. Jacobs offers advice on the 10 most importance challenges to strengthen long-term relationships.  “Butch Cassidy” by Charles Leerhsen is a biography of this complicated and notorious criminal.  “Chiquis Keto” by Chiquis Rivera is the 21-day starter kit for Latin food lovers. 

Books on CD

“The Boy from the Woods” by Harlan Coben begins with a missing teenage girl.  “The Persuasion” by Iris Johansen is an Eve Duncan mystery.  “Devoted” by Dean Koontz is a thriller about a terrifying thereat to humanity.  “The Last Trial” by Scott Turow is a legal thriller.  “Fair Warning” by Michael Connelly features journalist Jack McEvoy.  “The Suicide House” by Charlie Donlea opens with a murder in a prestigious prep school.  “Into Darkness” by Terry Goodkind is book five in the Children of D’Hara fantasy series. 

Downloadable e-books and audiobooks 

Ever since March, we have been buying more downloadable e-books and downloadable audio books for patrons of all ages – children, tweens, teens and adults.  Using cloudLibrary, you can download a book to read or an audio book to listen to.  The items in cloudLibrary are purchased separately from physical items, so the books available are different – and it continues to use the consortium’s contributions, not just those that we bought.  That is why you need to select AspenCat Union Catalog when setting up cloudLibrary for use.  Please email or phone us at 970-264-2209 if you need our help setting up this service on your device. 

Donations

We are deeply grateful to several donors for their generous contributions – from Patricia Howard and Donald Logan in honor of Bob and Carole Howard, from Bonni Pszola, and from Pam and Henry McGivern in memory of Susan Haney.

Material donations now can be put into the dropboxes both  at the library and also at City Market.  Donations will undergo the same rigorous three-day quarantine process as returns.  

Quotable Quote

“I think about all the people who’ve had to go through it alone, with no one to touch them, hug them, wipe a tear from their faces, laugh with them.  We’re humans.  We need to be together, even if it’s only on FaceTime.” – Actor-singer-songwriter Rita Wilson who, with her husband Tom Hanks, came down with COVID-19 when he was filming in Australia. 

7/30/2020

Summer Reading Program extended through August

The free all-ages Summer Reading Program at your library has been extended through the end of August, a decision that came from a desire to bring continued learning and fun to our community throughout the summer, according to Meg Wempe, director.  “It also provides more opportunity for us to purchase gift certificates from local businesses for our prizes to do our small part to help economic recovery,” she said.

If you haven’t already signed up, we hope you’ll take this opportunity to join us now.  You will receive a “choose your own adventure” booklet with fun activities and challenges. Completing them makes you eligible to win weekly prizes purchased from local businesses.

There are adventure booklets for four groups: pre-K, K-5, teen and adult. Pick them up at the library and view them on our website.  

To sign up, call us at (970) 264-2209, email ruby@pagosalibrary.org or register online at pagosalibrary.org/summer-reading. We need to know your name, contact information, and what age group to assign you to.

Details of our partial re-open

Here’s a summary of your library’s current operations:

  • Up to 20 patrons at a time can come into the building Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. to return books, browse, register for a new library card, make copies, send FAXs, pick up tax forms and check out materials like books, DVDs, CDs and periodicals.
  • The first hour every weekday – from 9-10 a.m. – is reserved for seniors and other high-risk people.
  • Eight computers are available weekdays from 9 a.m.-2 p.m., three by advance appointment and five for walk-ins.  Call us at 264-2209 or email ruby@pagosalibrary.org to schedule a time. In most cases computer usage will be limited to two hours per day. Staff will clean and disinfect the computers between uses.
  • One early literacy computer is available for youngsters on a walk-in basis Monday-Saturday.
  • Saturday hours are 10 a.m.-2 p.m. for building entry and 10 a.m.-1 p.m. for computer use.
  • Curbside service continues Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. for those not comfortable coming into the building  Phone 264-2209 when you are in the parking lot so staff can bring the items out for you.  If you put a hold on something, please wait for your usual alert (email, phone call or text) before coming to pick it up.  
  • Hand sanitizers are available and there will be frequent cleanings inside the building throughout the day.  Please  practice social distancing and wear facial coverings while you are in the building.  If you don’t have a mask, we are happy to give one to you.
  • Notary Public Service is available Mondays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays from 10 a.m.-3 p.m..  Cost is $5 per notary.
  • Tech time, ESL and GED are available.  See details below.
  • You can place holds on items from other libraries.  They are in different stages of courier service and reopening, so items may take longer than usual. 
  • If you do not have a library card but want to use our online resources, you can self-register.  From our website, click “My Account” in the top right.  It is the usual login page for current patrons, and it now has (in blue) an option to “Register for a new Library Card.”  There’s a short form and then staff will get back in touch with you to provide your login credentials.  If you previously self-registered, you now can pick up your physical card after providing proof of address.
  • We’re happy to provide tech help over the phone for our online resources. 
  •  Please note we are not accepting meeting room reservations or hosting any large in-person programming at this time. 

Book sale cancelled

Because of the coronavirus, the Friends of the Library have cancelled this year’s book sale, which had been scheduled for August 4-6.  

Fundraiser bumper stickers

Your library’s foundation has launched a small fundraiser with two different bumper stickers that can be purchased at the library for $5 each.  Both say, “I (heart symbol) my library.” 

New YA collection

We have added a new section to our Young Adult collection.  Called YA Series, it consists of shorter chapter books about 100 pages or fewer with content geared toward teens.  You’ll find it at the beginning of the Young Adult Fiction section.

Tech Time

Make an appointment for one of three slots available noon-1 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Brad will help one person (or one couple) at a time. 

ESL

In-person classes take place Tuesdays from 4-7 p.m.  Please register so we can keep it to a small group in our limited open spaces.  No walk-ins, as the front door will be locked. 

GED and other tutoring

GEDclasses plus HiSET, CDL and other in-person tutoring from Mark is available on Tuesdays from 2-7 p.m. by appointment for both new and returning students. 

Dungeons & Dragons via Zoom

Join us via Zoom on Tuesdays from 3-5 p.m. for Dungeons & Dragons open to teens and young adults.  Contact claire@pagosalibrary.org for details on how to join.  

Children’s programs on Facebook

Every Wednesday at 10 a.m. and Saturday at 2:30 p.m., join us on the library’s Facebook page.  Wednesday storytimes are now on Facebook Live, so if you go to Facebook at 10 a.m. you can interact with Josie.  Saturday’s Discovery Times with games, art ideas, science experiments, history and more are prerecorded.   If you have a Facebook account, log in to Facebook and search for the Ruby Sisson Memorial Library. If you don’t have a Facebook account, access the page by visiting our website and clicking the Facebook icon (a lowercase f)  in the upper left hand corner of the screen. Or contact us and we can send you a direct link.  

Storywalk program for kids

Every Thursday, Josie, your early literacy librarian, posts signs outside the library that follow the sidewalk up towards the Elementary School detailing a new Summer Reading Storywalk for kids.  The July 30-August 6 theme is invention.  Get outdoors and follow the pages of a book as you stroll along.  After you finish, pick up materials for a craft or activity at the library. 

Archuleta census response needs your help

As of July 20, only 38.7% of Archuleta County households had completed the census – and we need your help. There is still time to complete this important questionnaire. The deadline to complete the census online or by telephone has been extended to October 31. Census workers will also be visiting homes that have not responded to the 2020 Census to help make sure everyone is counted. The last day census workers have to visit your home is also October 31. Please contact Brad or Josie at the library if you have any census-related questions or visit 2020census.gov for more information.

Your participation directly affects hundreds of billions of dollars in federal funding for the next 10 years for local and regional agencies and projects like health clinics, fire departments, schools, social services like Medicaid, even roads and highways.  Archuleta County needs your participation to get our fair share of these federal dollars.

When you respond to the census, your answers are kept anonymous.  The law ensures that your private information is never published and that your answers cannot be used against you by any government agency or court.

Nonfiction

“Too Much and Never Enough” byMary Trump is a memoir of Donald Trump’s family by his niece.  “14 Miles” by DW Gibson tells of building the border wall in San Diego.  “The Lost Art of Dying” by physician and professor L.S. Dugale is a guide to preparing for a good death.  “Why Be Happy?” by psychologist Scott Hass explores the Japanese principle of acceptance, slowing down and destressing.  “Taking a Knee, Taking a Stand” by Devin McCourty explores the history of African American athletes’ fight for social justice going back to Jackie Robinson and Mohammed Ali.  “Becoming Duchess Glodblatt” is a memoir of a real-life writer who created a beautiful fictional social media character out of loneliness.  “Riding with a Ghost” by Justin Taylor is a memoir relates how a many deals with his troubled father.  “The Power of Choice” by Melissa Stockwell is a memoir of the author’s journey from wounded warrior to Paralympic world champion.

Books on CD

“Daddy’s Girls” by Danielle Steel tells of three sisters facing hard truths when their father dies.  “The Summer House” by James Patterson explores an unusual nighttime mass murder.  “Always the Last to Know” by Kristan Higgins follows a family upended when the father has a stroke.  “I’m Your Emotional Support Animal” by Adam Carolla examines how our culture war has careened off a cliff.  “The New Jim Crow” by Michelle Alexander is the 10th anniversary edition of the book that inspired a generation of criminal reform activists.

DVDs

“Miss Fisher and the Crypt of Tears” features the glamorous lady detective from the TV series.  “Sonic the Hedgehog” stars Jim Carey.

Large print

“The Dilemma” by B.A. Paris begins with a family secret about to be shared at a 40th birthday party.  “Frontier America” by William W. and J.A. Johnstone is a Preacher and MacCallister western.  “The Black Swan of Paris” by Karen Robards tells of a celebrated singer who is a resistance fighter in Paris in 1944.  “The Shadows” by Alex North is a murder mystery. 

Mysteries, suspense and thrillers

“Wonderland” by Zoje Stage is a thriller about a family set in New York’s Adirondack mountains.  “Outsider” by Linda Castillo is a thriller about a woman on the run hiding among the Amish. “The Lost and Found Bookshop” by Susan Wiggs takes place in a financially strapped bookstore in San Francisco.  “The Golden Cage” by Camilla Lackberg is a psychological thriller about the scorned wife of a billionaire.  “The Party Upstairs” by Lee Conell explores a crisis in the worlds of a wealthy tenant and the super’s daughter.  “Survivor Song” by Paul Tremblay is a psychological suspense story of an insidious virus.  “The Revelators” by Ace Atkins is part of the Quinn Colson crime series. 

Other novels

“Sex and Vanity” by Kevin Kawn, author of “Crazy Rich Asians,” follows a young woman torn between here WASP and the Chinese world.  “The Best Mistake” by Nora Roberts is a classic tale of finding the man of your dreams right under your nose.  “Antkind” by Charlie Kaufman begins with the find of a hitherto unseen film that may be the best movie ever made.  “Peace Talks” by Jim Butcher is the latest in the urban fantasy Dresden Files series.  “A Walk Along the Beach” by Debbie Macomber follows two sisters who must learn from each other’s strengths.  “The Vanishing Sky” by L. Annette Binder is the story of a German family during World War II.  “Malorie” by Josh Malerman is part of the Bird Box sci-fi series.

Downloadable e-books and audiobooks 

Ever since March, we have been buying more downloadable e-books and downloadable audio books for patrons of all ages – children, tweens, teens and adults.  Using cloudLibrary, you can download a book to read or an audio book to listen to.  The items in cloudLibrary are purchased separately from physical items, so the books available are different – and it continues to use the consortium’s contributions, not just those that we bought.  That is why you need to select AspenCat Union Catalog when setting up cloudLibrary for use.  Please email or phone us at 970-264-2209 if you need our help setting up this service on your device. 

Donations

Material donations now can be put into the dropbox at the library – but NOT into the dropbox at City Market.  Donations will undergo the same rigorous three-day quarantine process as returns.  

Quotable Quote

“We don’t value our ignorance enough.  Ignorance is really good to have if it is combined with curiosity.” – Alan Alda, actor, director, screenwriter, comedian and author. A six-time Emmy Award and Golden Globe Award winner, he played Hawkeye Pierce in the war television series M*A*S*H.  The M*A*S*H signoff remains the most-watched episode in TV history.

7/23/2020

Library reopening usage shows healthy pent-up demand

Checkout numbers and computer uses in just the first week of your library building’s reopening show a healthy pent-up demand since our closing in the middle of March. 

There were 2,152 checkouts in the first week, a number that was so high that Meg Wempe, library director, felt she had to doublecheck it to be sure it is accurate.  (It is.)  And there were 82 computer uses in the same period.  

“It all seems to be going very well,” Meg said.  “People are excited to be back inside the library – and we’re happy to see them.”

Here’s a summary of your library’s current operations:

  • Up to 20 patrons at a time can come into the building Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. to return books, browse, register for a new library card, make copies, send FAXs and check out materials like books, DVDs, CDs and periodicals.
  • The first hour every weekday – from 9-10 a.m. – is reserved for seniors and other high-risk people.
  • Eight computers are available weekdays from 9 a.m.-2 p.m., three by advance appointment and five for walk-ins.  Call us at 264-2209 or email ruby@pagosalibrary.org to schedule a time. In most cases computer usage will be limited to two hours per day. Staff will clean and disinfect the computers between uses.
  • One early literacy computer is available for youngsters on a walk-in basis Monday-Saturday.
  • Saturday hours are 10 a.m.-2 p.m. for building entry and 10 a.m.-1 p.m. for computer use.
  • Curbside service continues Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. for those not comfortable coming into the building  Phone 264-2209 when you are in the parking lot so staff can bring the items out for you.  If you put a hold on something, please wait for your usual alert (email, phone call or text) before coming to pick it up.  
  • Hand sanitizers are available and there will be frequent cleanings inside the building throughout the day.  Please  practice social distancing and wear facial coverings while you are in the building.  If you don’t have a mask, we are happy to give one to you.
  • Notary Public Service is available Mondays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays from 10 a.m.-3 p.m..  Cost is $5 per notary.
  • Tech time, ESL and GED are available.  See details below.
  • You can place holds on items from other libraries.  They are in different stages of courier service and reopening, so items may take longer than usual. 
  • If you do not have a library card but want to use our online resources, you can self-register.  From our website, click “My Account” in the top right.  It is the usual login page for current patrons, and it now has (in blue) an option to “Register for a new Library Card.”  There’s a short form and then staff will get back in touch with you to provide your login credentials.  If you previously self-registered, you now can pick up your physical card after providing proof of address.
  • We’re happy to provide tech help over the phone for our online resources. 
  •  Please note we are not accepting meeting room reservations or hosting any large in-person programming at this time. 

Book sale cancelled

Because of the coronavirus, the Friends of the Library have cancelled this year’s book sale, which had been scheduled for August 4-6.  

Fundraiser bumper stickers

Your library’s foundation has launched a small fundraiser with two different bumper stickers that can be purchased at the library for $5 each.  Both say, “I (heart symbol) my library.” 

HVAC installation  

Our long-awaited HVAC project is well underway. We apologize for the noise and will have earplugs available at our front door greeter station.

Summer Reading Program

Here’s information on the free all-ages Summer Reading Program that runs until the end of August:

  • You receive a “choose your own adventure” booklet with fun activities and challenges. Completing them makes you eligible to win weekly prizes purchased from local businesses.
  • There are adventure booklets for four groups: pre-K, K-5, teen and adult. Pick them up at the library and view them on our website.  
  • To sign up, call us at (970) 264-2209, email ruby@pagosalibrary.org or register online at pagosalibrary.org/summer-reading. We need to know your name, contact information, and what age group to assign you to.
  • In addition to the adventure booklets, a new all-ages challenge appears each week in this Library News column. Anyone who completes the challenge will be entered to win a weekly drawing for various prizes.

Challenge 9:  What’s your favorite place in Pagosa?

Our final challenge:  Tell us about your favorite place to visit in or around Pagosa Springs. It could be a favorite fishing spot, a favorite park or restaurant, or another place you love. How did you first discover it? What is your favorite thing about this place?  Submit a brief description to ruby@pagosalibrary.org.  A photograph is welcome but not required. All ages can participate, and everyone who submits an entry will be entered into our weekly prize drawing. Please include a name and phone number with your submission.

New YA collection

We have added a new section to our Young Adult collection.  Called YA Series, it consists of shorter chapter books about 100 pages or fewer with content geared toward teens.  You’ll find it at the beginning of the Young Adult Fiction section.

Tech Time

Make an appointment for one of three slots available noon-1 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Brad will help one person (or one couple) at a time. 

ESL

Classes are resuming Tuesdays from 4-7 p.m.  Please register so we can keep it to a small group in our limited open spaces.  No walk-ins, as the front door will be locked. 

GED and a special thank-you

GEDclasses plus HiSet, CDL and other tutoring from Mark is available on Tuesdays from 2-7 p.m. by appointment for both new and returning students.  We also want to express our gratitude to LPEA for their donation of  $700 for our GED program.  We will use these funds for test scholarships, materials such as online practice tests that we purchase, and for materials aimed at further preparing students to pass.

Dungeons & Dragons via Zoom

Join us via Zoom on Tuesdays from 3-5 p.m. for Dungeons & Dragons open to teens and young adults.  Contact claire@pagosalibrary.org for details on how to join.  

Children’s programs on Facebook

Every Wednesday at 10 a.m. and Saturday at 2:30 p.m., join us on the library’s Facebook page.  Wednesday storytimes are now on Facebook Live, so if you go to Facebook at 10 a.m. you can interact with Josie.  Saturday’s Discovery Times with games, art ideas, science experiments, history and more are prerecorded.   If you have a Facebook account, log in to Facebook and search for the Ruby Sisson Memorial Library. If you don’t have a Facebook account, access the page by visiting our website and clicking the Facebook icon (a lowercase f)  in the upper left hand corner of the screen. Or contact us and we can send you a direct link.  

Storywalk program for kids

Every Thursday, Josie, your early literacy librarian, posts signs outside the library that follow the sidewalk up towards the Elementary School detailing a new Summer Reading Storywalk for kids.  The July 23-30 theme is monsters.  Get outdoors and follow the pages of a book for a fun-filled healthy activity.  After you finish, pick up materials for a craft or activity at the library. 

Please complete the census now 

To complete the census online, go to www.my2020census.gov or by phone call 1-844-330-2020 for the English version and 1-844-468-2020 for the Spanish version.  You can visit our website at pagosalibrary.org/census-2020 to view a video that demonstrates how to fill out the census online.  Please phone the library at (970) 264-2209 or email us at ruby@pagosalibrary.org if you have any questions regarding the census. 

Your participation directly affects hundreds of billions of dollars in federal funding for the next 10 years for local and regional agencies and projects like health clinics, fire departments, schools, social services like Medicaid, even roads and highways.  Archuleta County needs your participation to get our fair share of these federal dollars.

When you respond to the census, your answers are kept anonymous.  The law ensures that your private information is never published and that your answers cannot be used against you by any government agency or court.

Novels

“The Ten Thousand Doors of January” by Alix E. Harrow begins with finding a book about secret doors.  “Friends and Strangers” by J. Courtney Sullivan explores a complicated friendship between two women.  “The Vanishing Half” by Brit Bennett follows twins who chose to live in two different worlds, one black and one white.  “The Sisters of the Winter Wood” by Rena Rossner is a fantasy.  “The Book of M” by Peng Shepherd is set in a dangerous near-future world.  “Circe” by Madeline Miller, a fantasy, is the follow-up to “The Song of Achilles.”              “Utopia Avenue” by David Mitchell tells of a band in the psychedelic London music scene in the l960s.  “Mother Daughter Widow Wife” by Robin Wasserman is a compassionate look bat a woman with no money, no ID and no memory as people take advantage of her.

Books on CD

“Crooked River” by Preston & Child is a mystery that begins when dozens of shoes are washed up on a Florida beach.  “Robert Ludlum’s The Treadstone Resurrection” by Joshua Hood goes behind a top-secret CIA Black Ops program.  “A Reasonable Doubt” by Philip Margolin begins when a magician is murdered on stage.  “The Mirror & the Light” by Hilary Mantel is the third book in the Thomas Cromwell Wolf Hall trilogy.  “The Warsaw Protocol” by Steve Berry is the latest in the Corton Malone weapons of Christ relics series.  “Journey of the Pharaohs” by Clive Cussler and Graham Brown is a Kurt Austin NUMA adventure.  “You Are Not Alone” by Greer Hendricks & Sarah Pekkahen is a thriller.  ”Blindside” by James Patterson and James O. Born is a Det. Michael Bennett thriller.

Nonfiction

“Lady Romeo” by Tana Wojczuk is the biography of Charlotte Cushman, a U.S. actress famous around the world in the mid-1870s who is almost unknown today.  “Promised Land” by David Stebenne chronicles how the rise of the middle class transformed American from 1929-1968.  “Countdown 1945” by Chris Wallace follows the Manhattan Project’s development of the atomic bomb and the decision to drop it on Hiroshima.  “Me and White Supremacy” by Layla F. Saad teaches others how to understand their white privilege and change their often unconscious behaviors.  “When Truth Is All Youi Have” by Jim McCloskey is a memoir of faith, justice and freedom for the wrongly convicted helped by the Centurion Ministries.

Downloadable e-books and audiobooks 

Ever since March, we have been buying more downloadable e-books and downloadable audio books for patrons of all ages – children, tweens, teens and adults.  Using cloudLibrary, you can download a book to read or an audio book to listen to.  The items in cloudLibrary are purchased separately from physical items, so the books available are different – and it continues to use the consortium’s contributions, not just those that we bought.  That is why you need to select AspenCat Union Catalog when setting up cloudLibrary for use.  Please email or phone us at 970-264-2209 if you need our help setting up this service on your device. 

Donations

Material donations now can be put into the dropbox at the library – but NOT into the dropbox at City Market.  Donations will undergo the same rigorous three-day quarantine process as returns.  

Quotable Quote

“Conscience is the inner voice that warns us that someone may be looking.” – H. L. Mencken (1880-1956), American journalist, essayist and satirist.

07/16/2020

New YA teen series and library reopening going well

We are delighted to announce that we are adding a new section to our Young Adult collection.  Called YA Series, it consists of shorter chapter books about 100 pages or fewer with content geared toward teens.  You’ll find it at the beginning of the Young Adult Fiction section.

“These books are short and engaging reads which are ideal for teens who don’t already like to read, or who may not be as confident in their reading ability but who still want to read books with stories they will enjoy,” said Claire Spence, teen services librarian. “We will start very small, with only one shelf.  If the series proves to be popular, then we’ll look at expanding.” 

The collection will include books like “A Name Earned” by Tim Tingle, which earned a starred review on Kirkus;  “Thicker Than Water”by Natasha Deen; “The Unbroken Hearts Club”by Brooke Carter; and plenty more from multiple genres including mystery, horror, science fiction and romance.

More library reopening news

“It seems to be going well,” said Meg Wempe, library director.  “People are excited to be back inside the library – and we’re happy to see them.”

That’s the staff reaction as your library building is now partially reopen for the first time since the middle of March, albeit with some limitations.  Services currently available:

  • New:  Tech time, ESL and GED.  See details below.
  • Up to 20 patrons at a time can come into the building Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. to return books, browse, register for a new library card, make copies, send FAXs, pick up tax forms and check out materials like books, DVDs, CDs and periodicals.
  • The first hour every weekday – from 9-10 a.m. – is reserved for seniors and other high-risk people.
  • Eight computers are available weekdays from 9 a.m.-2 p.m., three by advance appointment and five for walk-ins.  Call us at 264-2209 or email ruby@pagosalibrary.org to schedule a time. In most cases computer usage will be limited to two hours per day. Staff will continue to clean and disinfect the computers between uses.
  • One early literacy computer is available for youngsters on a walk-in basis Monday-Saturday.
  • Saturday hours are 10 a.m.-2 p.m. for building entry and 10 a.m.-1 p.m. for computer use.
  • Curbside service continues Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. for those not comfortable coming into the building  Phone 264-2209 when you are in the parking lot so staff can bring the items out for you.  If you put a hold on something, please wait for your usual alert (email, phone call or text) before coming to pick it up.  
  • For safety’s sake, hand sanitizers are available and there will be frequent cleanings inside the building throughout the day.  Also, please  practice social distancing and wear facial coverings while you are in the building.  If you don’t have a mask, we are happy to give one to you.
  • Notary Public Service is now available Mondays, Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays from 10 a.m.-3 p.m. Cost is $5 per notary.
  • You now can place holds on items from other libraries.  They are in different stages of courier service and reopening, so items may take longer than usual. 
  • If you do not have a library card but want to use our online resources, you can self-register.  From our website, click “My Account” in the top right.  It is the usual login page for current patrons, and it now has (in blue) an option to “Register for a new Library Card.”  There’s a short form and then staff will get back in touch with you to provide your login credentials.  If you previously self-registered, you now can pick up your physical card after providing proof of address.
  • We’re also happy to provide tech help over the phone for our online resources. 
  • Please note we are not accepting meeting room reservations or hosting any large in-person programming at this time. 

Tall Tale contest

Do you have an extravagant story to tell?  Submit your entries to our all-ages Tall Tale contest by 5 p.m. tomorrow, Friday, July 17.  Winners will be announced on July 20.  Submissions should be original stories but can use already existing characters.  Both written entries and audio recordings will be accepted — not videos, please. 

Prizes will be awarded in the following categories: Pre-Writers, Emerging Writers, Developed Writers-Children, Developed Writers-Teens, Developed Writers-Adults, and Judge’s Choice.   For more information and submission guidelines, please visit the library website at pagosalibrary.org or call us at (970)264-2209. 

Email your tale to ruby@pagosalibrary.org, or deliver a hard copy to the library.  All entries should be clearly labeled as entries to the Tall Tale contest and include the author’s name, age, and contact information. You do not need to have a library card to participate. 

Book sale cancelled

Because of the coronavirus, the Friends of the Library have cancelled this year’s book sale, which had been scheduled for August 4-6.  

Fundraiser bumper stickers

Your library’s foundation has launched a small fundraiser with two different bumper stickers that can be purchased at the library for $5 each.  Both say, “I (heart symbol) my library.” 

HVAC installation  

Our long-awaited HVAC project is well underway. We apologize for the noise and will have earplugs available at our front door greeter station.

Summer Reading Program

It’s not too late to sign up for the free all-ages Summer Reading Program that runs until July 31.

  • You will be given a “choose your own adventure” booklet with fun activities and challenges. Completing them makes you eligible to win weekly prizes purchased from local businesses.
  • There are adventure booklets for four groups: pre-K, K-5, teen and adult. Pick them up at the library and view them on our website.  
  • To sign up, call us at (970) 264-2209, email ruby@pagosalibrary.org or register online at pagosalibrary.org/summer-reading. We just need to know your name, contact information, and what age group to assign you to.
  • In addition to the adventure booklets, a new all-ages challenge will appear each week in this Library News column. Anyone who completes the challenge will be entered to win a weekly drawing for various prizes.

Challenge 8:  Design a bookmark

Put your creative skills to the test and design a bookmark. Bookmarks are typically 2” wide and 7” long, but yours can be any length or shape. Please do not copy a design found online; we want to see originality expressed in your design. Submit a photograph of your completed bookmark to ruby@pagosalibrary.org. All ages can participate, and everyone who submits a design will be entered into our weekly prize drawing. Please include a name and phone number with your submission.

Tech Time

Make an appointment for one of three slots available noon-1 p.m. Tuesdays, Wednesdays and Thursdays. Brad will be helping one person (or one couple) at a time. 

ESL

Classes are resuming Tuesdays from 4-7 p.m.  Please register so we can keep it to a small group in our limited open spaces.  No walk-ins, as the front door will be locked. 

GED

GEDclasses plus HiSet, CDL and other tutoring is available on Tuesdays from 2-7 p.m. by appointment for both new and returning students. 

Dungeons & Dragons via Zoom

Join us via Zoom on Tuesdays from 2-4 pm for our Dungeons & Dragons group   open to teens and young adults.  Contact claire@pagosalibrary.org for details on how to join.  

Family storytimes on Facebook

Every Wednesday at 10 a.m. and Saturday at 2:30 p.m., join us for great stories and fun songs on the library’s Facebook page.  Wednesday storytimes are now on Facebook Live, so if you go to Facebook at 10 a.m. you can interact with Josie – and she is eager to have a live audience.  Saturday’s sessions are prerecorded.   If you have a Facebook account, log in to Facebook and search for the Ruby Sisson Memorial Library. If you don’t have a Facebook account, access the page by visiting our website and clicking the Facebook icon (a lowercase f)  in the upper left hand corner of the screen. Or contact us and we can send you a direct link.  These sessions are available to watch for about two weeks after the initial posting.

Storywalk program for kids

Every Thursday, Josie, your early literacy librarian, will post signs outside the library that follow the sidewalk up towards the Elementary School detailing a new Summer Reading Storywalk for kids.  The July 16-23 theme is legends.  Get outdoors and follow the pages of a book for a fun-filled activity.  After you finish, pick up materials for a craft or activity at the library. 

Please complete the census now 

To complete the census online, go to www.my2020census.gov or by phone call 1-844-330-2020 for the English version and 1-844-468-2020 for the Spanish version.  You can visit our website at pagosalibrary.org/census-2020 to view a video that demonstrates how to fill out the census online.  Please phone the library at (970) 264-2209 or email us at ruby@pagosalibrary.org if you have any questions regarding the census. 

Your participation will directly affect hundreds of billions of dollars in federal funding for the next 10 years for local and regional agencies and projects like health clinics, fire departments, schools, social services like Medicaid, even roads and highways.  Archuleta County needs your participation to get our fair share of these federal dollars.

When you respond to the census, your answers are kept anonymous.  The law ensures that your private information is never published and that your answers cannot be used against you by any government agency or court.

Nonfiction

“The Room Where It Happened” by John Bolton is a memoir of the Trump Administration by the former national security advisor.  “Stamped from the Beginning” by Ibram X. Kendi is a history of racist ideas in America.  “Demagogue” by Larry Tye is a biography of Sen. Joe McCarthy.

Books on CD

“The Book of Longings” by Sue Monk Kidd imagines the life of a young woman married to Jesus.  “Texas Outlaw” by James Patterson and Andrew Bourelle is a Texas Ranger western.  “Hit List” by Stuart Woods is a Stone Barrington thriller.  “The 20th Victim” by James Patterson and Maxine Paetro is a Women’s Murder Club adventure.  “Walk the Fire” by David Baldacci features Amos Decker in the Memory Man mystery series.  “Camino Winds” by John Grisham is a mystery set during a hurricane.  “Masked Prey” by John Sandford is a Lucas Davenport thriller.  “North of Laramie” by William W. and J.A. Johnstone is a Buck Trammel western.  “Phantom Hill” by Carlton Stowers is a Ralph Compton western.  “Bad Apple” by Lancaster Hill is a novel of the Alamo. 

Mysteries and thrillers

“Hush” by James Patterson and Candice Fox features a former detective freed from jail by a police commissioner who needs her help.  “The Clutter Corpse” is a new mystery series featuring amateur sleuth and de-clutterer Ellen Curtis.  “Her Last Flight” by Beatriz Williams is a suspense story of a lost pilot and a wartime photographer.    “Black Book” by James Patterson and David Ellis centers on what is missing from a madam’s customer book.

Other novels

“The Lion’s Den” by Katherine St. John is set on a luxury yacht in the Mediterranean.  “Blue Ticket” by Sophie Mackintosh is a feminist dystopian tale that imagines a world in which a girl’s fate is chosen for her.  “Mrs. Lincoln’s Sisters” by Jennifer Chiaverini takes place after the president’s assassination.  “A Burning” by Megha Majumdar tells of three young people seeking to better their lives in India.  “The Second Home” by Christina Clancy showcases three siblings dealing with secrets and nostalgia.  “Seven Lies” by Elizabeth Kay begins with a lie between two best friends.

Downloadable e-books and audiobooks 

Ever since March, we have been buying more downloadable e-books and downloadable audio books for patrons of all ages – children, tweens, teens and adults.  Using cloudLibrary, you can download a book to read or an audio book to listen to.  The items in cloudLibrary are purchased separately from physical items, so the books available are different – and it continues to use the consortium’s contributions, not just those that we bought.  That is why you need to select AspenCat Union Catalog when setting up cloudLibrary for use.  Please email or phone us at 970-264-2209 if you need our help setting up this service on your device. 

Donations

We are grateful for the generous monetary donations from Susan and Terry Arrington and from Lenore Bright in memory of  James Adams.  Material donations now can be put into the dropbox at the library – but NOT into the dropbox at City Market.  Donations will undergo the same rigorous three-day quarantine process as returns.  

Quotable Quote

“When you get right down to the root of the meaning of the word ‘succeed,’ you will find that it simply means to follow through.” – F. W. Nichol (1955-1892), IBM executive. He made the first-ever business call from the U.S. to China when he called IBM’s Shanghai office from New York in May 1937.

7/9/2020

Library building is partially reopened, plus new Tall Tale contest

It is with great pleasure that we announce that your library building has now partially reopened for the first time since the middle of March, albeit with some limitations.  Here’s what services are currently available:

  • Up to 20 patrons at a time are now welcome to come into the building from Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. to return books, browse, register for a new library card, make copies, send FAXs, pick up tax forms and check out materials like books, DVDs, CDs and periodicals.
  • The first hour of that timeframe every weekday – from 9-10 a.m. – is reserved for seniors and other high-risk people.
  • Eight computers are now available weekdays from 9 a.m.-2 p.m., three by appointment arranged in advance and five for walk-ins.  To make a computer appointment, call the library at 264-2209 or email ruby@pagosalibrary.org to schedule a time. With some possible exceptions, computer usage will be limited to two hours per day. Staff will continue to clean and disinfect the computers between uses.
  • As well, one early literacy computer will be available for youngsters on a walk-in basis Monday-Saturday.
  • Saturday hours are 10 a.m.-2 p.m. for building entry and 10 a.m.-1 p.m. for computer use.
  • Curbside service outside the front door continues Monday-Friday from 9 a.m.-3 p.m. and Saturday from 10 a.m.-2 p.m. for those not comfortable coming into a public building at this time.  Phone the library at 264-2209 when you are in the parking lot so that staff can bring the items out for you.  If you put a hold on something from home, please wait for your usual alert (email, phone call or text) before coming to pick it up.  
  • For safety’s sake, hand sanitizers will be available and there will be frequent cleanings inside the building throughout the day.  Also, we’re asking everyone to practice social distancing and wear facial coverings while you are in the building.  If you don’t have a mask, we are happy to give one to you.
  • We have resumed providing a Notary Public Service for anyone who needs something notarized.  The cost is $5 per notary.  This service is available Mondays, Thursdays and Saturdays from 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.  
  • You now are able to place holds on items from other libraries.  Libraries are in different stages of courier service and reopening, so items may take longer than usual. 
  • If you do not have a library card but want to use our online resources, you now can self-register.  From our website, click “My Account” in the top right.  It is the usual login page for current patrons, and it now has (in blue) an option to “Register for a new Library Card.”  There’s a short form and then staff will get back in touch with you to give you your login credentials.  If you previously self-registered, you now can pick up your physical card after providing proof of address.
  • We’re also happy to provide tech help over the phone for our online resources. 
  •  Please note we are not accepting meeting room reservations or hosting any large in-person programming at this time.  We hope you will join us for some of our virtual programs outlined in these Library News columns.  We will be resuming small one-on-one classes such as GED, ESL and Tech Time.  Please contact the library for information.

“We are so pleased to be starting the reopening process and providing more   services to our patrons,”  said Meg Wempe, library director.  “We want everyone to enjoy a safe, productive and happy visit when you come to your library.   But we ask you to avoid hanging out inside for too long so that we can serve more people throughout the day and help keep everyone safe.”

We are putting together a short video to share some of the changes in the library  to help you know what to expect when you return. It will be posted on our Facebook page as well as on our website. 

New Tall Tale contest

Calling storytellers of all ages and abilities – your library is hosting a Tall Tale contest.  Do you have an extravagant story to tell?  If so, we want to hear from you.  Submit your entries between Monday, July 13 and Friday, July 17 by 5 p.m.  Winners will be announced on July 20.

Submissions should be original stories but can use already existing characters.  Both written entries and audio recordings will be accepted. Please do not send video entries. 

Prizes will be awarded in the following categories: Pre-Writers, Emerging Writers, Developed Writers-Children, Developed Writers-Teens, Developed Writers-Adults, and Judge’s Choice.   For more information and submission guidelines, please visit the library website at pagosalibrary.org or call us at (970)264-2209. 

Email your tale to ruby@pagosalibrary.org, or deliver a hard copy to the library. All entries should be clearly labeled as entries to the Tall Tale contest and include the author’s name, age, and contact information. You do not need to have a library card to participate. 

Book sale cancelled

Because of the coronavirus, the Friends of the Library have decided to cancel this year’s sale, which had been scheduled for August 4-6.  Questions or concerns that the public may have can be directed to friends@pagosalibrary.org, which is the Friends email address.

Fundraiser bumper stickers

Your library’s foundation has launched a small fundraiser with two different bumper stickers that cost $5 each.  Both say, “ I (heart symbol) my library.”  If you want to purchase one to show your support, they are available during curbside hours.

HVAC installation  

Our long-awaited HVAC project has started and should take another month to complete.  We apologize for the noise, particularly in the next week with the continued dismantling/demolition of the old system.  We will have earplugs available at our front door greeter station.

Summer Reading Program

It’s not too late to sign up for the free Summer Reading Program that runs until July 31. Fun activities are open to people of all ages and abilities.

  • You will be given a “choose your own adventure” booklet full of activities and challenges designed to help you explore a world of stories. The activities are fun to do – and  completing them makes you eligible to win weekly prizes purchased from local businesses. The booklets include a map of an imaginary island that needs saving or it will fade away.  As you travel to different places on the map and complete various tasks, you will save the island and be able to win prizes. The island is full of fun and interesting locations such as the Neighborhood Village, Fairytale Forest, Mythic Mountains, Cliffs of Adventure and more.
  • There are adventure booklets for four groups: pre-K, K-5, teen and adult. You can pick them up curbside at the library and view them on our website.  As well, many booklets are being delivered through the school lunch delivery program.
  • Are you ready to begin your journey? To sign up, call us at (970) 264-2209, email us at ruby@pagosalibrary.org or register online at pagosalibrary.org/summer-reading. We just need to know your name, contact information, and what age group to assign you to.
  • In addition to the adventure booklets, a new all-ages challenge will appear each week in this Library News column and be announced on KWUF radio. Anyone who completes the challenge will be entered to win a weekly drawing for various prizes.

Challenge 7:  Blackout poetry

Create a piece of blackout poetry using the Library News column or another article found in The Pagosa Springs SUN newspaper.  A blackout poem is created when you blackout or redact the words in the article that you don’t want, leaving behind the words you want to use in your poem.  Take a picture of your poem and email it to the library at ruby@pagosalibrary.org, drop it off during curbside hours (M-F 10 a.m. – 3 p.m.), post it on the library’s Facebook page, or call in to (970) 264-2209 and tell us your poem. Everyone can participate, and entries will be entered into a weekly prize drawing.  

Dungeons & Dragons via Zoom

Go on an adventure from the comfort of your couch.  Join us via Zoom on Tuesdays from 2-4 pm for our new Dungeons & Dragons group.  This program is open to teens and young adults.  Contact claire@pagosalibrary.org for details on how to join.  

Family storytimes on Facebook

Every Wednesday at 10 a.m. and Saturday at 2:30 p.m., join us for great stories and fun songs on the library’s Facebook page.  Wednesday storytimes are now on Facebook Live, so if you go to Facebook at 10 a.m. you can interact with Josie – and she is eager to have a live audience.  Saturday’s sessions continue to be prerecorded.   If you have a Facebook account, log in to Facebook and search for the Ruby Sisson Memorial Library. If you don’t have a Facebook account, access the page by visiting our website and clicking the Facebook icon (a lowercase f)  in the upper left hand corner of the screen. Or contact us and we can send you a direct link.  These sessions are available to watch for about two weeks after the initial posting.

Storywalk program for kids

Every Thursday, Josie, your early literacy librarian, will post “signs” outside the library that follow the sidewalk up towards the Elementary School detailing a new Summer Reading Storywalk for kids.  The July 9-16 theme is adventure.  Get outdoors and follow the pages of a book to enjoy a fun-filled exploration of new places.  After you finish, pick up materials for a craft or activity at the library during curbside hours (Monday-Friday 10 a.m.-3 p.m.). 

Please complete the census now 

To complete the census online, go to www.my2020census.gov or by phone call 1-844-330-2020 for the English version and 1-844-468-2020 for the Spanish version.  You can visit our website at pagosalibrary.org/census-2020 to view a video that demonstrates how to fill out the census online.  Please phone the library at (970) 264-2209 or email us at ruby@pagosalibrary.org if you have any questions regarding the census. 

Your participation will directly affect hundreds of billions of dollars in federal funding for the next 10 years for local and regional agencies and projects like health clinics, fire departments, schools, social services like Medicaid, even roads and highways.  Archuleta County needs your participation to get our fair share of these federal dollars.

When you respond to the census, your answers are kept anonymous.  The law ensures that your private information is never published and that your answers cannot be used against you by any government agency or court.

DVDs

“101 Dalmatians” is the Walt Disney animated film.  “Queen & Slim” is a romantic drama.  “Onward” is a Disney Pixar animated film.

Books on CD

“The Last Odyssey” by James Rollins is a Sigma Force adventure.  “The Glass Hotel” by Emily St. John Mandel is a story of greed and guilt, love and delusion. “Revenge” by James Patterson and Andrew Holmes is a murder mystery featuring an SAS soldier.  “Redhead by the Side of the Road” by Anne Tyler is a story of second chances and misperceptions. 

Mysteries and thrillers

“Death in Her Hands” by Ottessa Moshfegh is a horror suspense tale of an elderly widow whose life is overturned after she finds an ominous note in the woods.  “Ghosts of Harvard” by Francesca Seritella follows a woman investigating her brother’s suicide on campus.  “The Summer House” by James Patterson and Brandan DuBois is set in a house that once was the scene of a nighttime mass murder.  “The Persuasion” by Iris Johansen focuses on forensic sculptor Eve Duncan when her daughter becomes a killer’s target.

Other novels

“Gideon the Ninth” by Tamsun Muir is the first book in the new Locked Tomb science fantasy trilogy.  “28 Summers” by Elin Hilderbrand is a romance story inspired by “Same Time Next Year.”  “Daddy’s Girls” by Danielle Steel follows three daughters living on a California ranch after their father dies.  “Home Before Dark” by Riley Sager is the story of a house with long-buried secrets.  “Dance with Me” by Susan Elizabeth Phillips features two solitary people and is set in Tennessee.  “Eliza Starts a Rumor” by Jane L. Rosen centers on two competing bulletin boards.  “American Demon” by Kim Harrison is the latest in the Hollows urban fantasy series.

Nonfiction

“The Art of Her Deal” by Pulitzer Prize winner Mary Jordan is a biography of First Lady Melania Trump.  “Be An Antiracist” by National Book Award winner Ibram X. Kendi is a new look at understanding and uprooting racism and inequality in our society.  “Five Days” by Rhodes Scholar Wes Moore and Erica L. Green reviews the uprising that overtook Baltimore in 2015 when Freddie Gray was arrested and died in police custody.  “White Fragility” by educator Robin Diangelo looks at why it is so hard for white people to talk about racism.

Large print

“Formidable Foes” by Rita Mae and Sneaky Pie Brown is a mystery featuring two felines.  “Hideaway” by Nora Roberts features a woman who is Hollywood royalty.  “On Ocean Boulevard” by Mary Alice Monroe is the latest in the Beach House series.  “Bombshell” by Stuart Woods and Parnell Hall is a Teddy Fay mystery featuring Stone Barrington.  “The Lies That Bind” by Emily Giffin is a mystery featuring an investigative reporter.  “Credible Threat” by J. A. Jance is an Ali Reynolds mystery.  “The Goodbye Man” by Jeffry Deaver is about a hate crime in the wilderness of Washington State.  “A Week at the Shore” by Barbara Delinsky features three sisters coming together 20 years later.           

Downloadable e-books and audiobooks 

While the coronavirus restrictions keep you from browsing inside the library, we suggest a fun digital alternative:  Ever since March when we had to close the building, we have been buying more downloadable e-books and downloadable audio books for patrons of all ages – children, tweens, teens and adults.  

Using cloudLibrary, you can download a book to read or an audio book to listen to.  The items in cloudLibrary are purchased separately from physical items, so the books available are different – and it continues to use the consortium’s contributions, not just those that we bought.  That is why you need to select AspenCat Union Catalog when setting up cloudLibrary for use.  Please email or phone us at 970-264-2209 if you need our help setting up this service on your device. 

Donations

We are grateful for the generous monetary donation of Lenore Bright in memory of Mamie Lynch.  Your material donations now can be put into the dropbox at the library, effective immediately – but NOT into the dropbox at City Market.  Donations will undergo the same rigorous three-day quarantine process as returns.  

Quotable Quote

“If you are feeling helpless,  help someone else.  If you are feeling alone, don’t ignore another person’s loneliness.  If you are afraid, be brave for someone else.  Things feel more doable if they are not about you.” – Shonda Rhimes, American TV producer, TV and film writer, and author, best known as the creator of “Grey’s Anatomy.”